Alchemy Academy archive
July 2002

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Subject: ACADEMY: Lull and the ars magna
From: Roberto
Tue, 2 Jul 2002

May I suggest you visit the Augsburg Web Edition of
Llull's Electoral Writings (Version 2002.04)

http://www.math.uni-augsburg.de/stochastik/llull/

Subject: ACADEMY : Cauda Pavonis
Thu, 4 Jul 2002
From: Michal Pober

Dear Friends,

Here or somewhere else I remember reading that Cauda
Pavonis was under threat.

I just tried this website, which I received in connection to a
particular article but it yields an error message.

http://libarts.wsu.edu/english/Journals/CaudaPavonis/CaudaPavonis.html

Does anyone have definitive information about the Magazine
and or what I presume was the archive of previous issues.

Thanks!

Michal Pober

Subject: ACADEMY : Cauda Pavonis
Fri, 5 Jul 2002
From: Marcella Gillick

Dear Michal,

If you get rid of the last bit of the URL it works:-

http://libarts.wsu.edu/english/Journals/CaudaPavonis/

best wishes
Marcella

Subject: ACADEMY : Le Cosmopolite 1691
Sat, 06 Jul 2002
From: Rafal T. Prinke


Dear all,

I have two references to the French edition of Sendivogius's
works of 1691, giving different titles and - what is more
important - different formats (8-o and 12-o). Both point to
Langlet-Dufresnoy, Hist. de la Phil. Herm. III 141.

Does anyone have easy access to it and can check what
he actually says about these formats there?

Best regards,

Rafal

Subject: ACADEMY : Le Cosmopolite 1691
From: José Rodríguez Guerrero
Sat, 6 Jul 2002


Dear Rafal T. Pinke:

I think the 1691 edition usually appears "In-12".

Author: Micha Jakób Sedziwój.

Title: Cosmopolite, ou Nouvelle lumière chimique [trad. par Jean Beguin],
pour servir d'éclaircissement aux trois principes de la nature, exactement
décrits dans les trois traités suivants : le I. traite du mercure, le II.,
du soufre, et le III., du vrai sel des philosophes. Dernière édition, revue
et augmentée des Lettres philosophiques du même auteur

Publisher: Laurent d'Houry.

City: Paris.

Physical Description: 2 tomes in 1 vol. (In-12).

Holding Library: Bibliothèque Nationale du France: R-32446

This edition have five parts with separate titlepages:

Tome I

Part 1: Traite du mercure

Part 2: Traite du soufre

Part 3: Traite du vrai sel des philosophes

Tome II

Part 4: Traitez du cosmopolite nouvellement découverts, ou après avoir donné
une idée d'une société de philosophes, on explique dans plusieurs lettres de
cet autheur la théorie et la pratique des veritez hermétiques

Part 5: Lettres de Michel Sendivogius, ou de J. J. D. I.* (* c'est-àdire,
Jean Joachim Destinguel d'Ingrofont) communement appellé Cosmopolite, sur la
theorie & la pratique de la pierre philosophale.

However, I found notices about an edition with different format (In-8) in
France (Université Louis Pasteur).

Title: Cosmopolite ou nouvelle lumière chymique, pour servir
d'éclaircissement aux trois principes de la nature, excitement décrits dans
les trois traitez suivans, Le 1: traite du mercure; le 2: du soufre; & le 3:
du vray sel des philosophes. : Dernière édition, revue & augmentée des
lettres philosophiques du mesme auteur.

I don't know if it is true, becouse I have not checked that copy. I think
you can ask for more information in:

Bibliothèque des Sciences et Techniques (Université Louis Pasteur)

http://www-scd-ulp.u-strasbg.fr/bib/bib1.html

Subject: ACADEMY : Nazari
From: Adam McLean
7th July 2002

Does anyone have any information on Giovanni Battista Nazari
the author of the 16th century Italian allegorical alchemical
work 'Della tramutatione metallica sogni tre' ?

Does anyone know of any articles on Nazari or his work ?


Adam McLean


Subject: ACADEMY : Le Cosmopolite 1691
Sun, 07 Jul 2002
From: Rafal T. Prinke

Dear José,

Thank you very much.

> I think the 1691 edition usually appears "In-12".

Yes, I have some references to actual copies in this format - but
so far none to 8-o. There also seems to be a "super-title" or
title page for the whole set, reading:

Les Oeuvres du Cosmopolite, Divisez en trois Traitez.
Dans lesquels sont clairement expliqués les trois Principes
des Philosophes Chymiques, sel, Soufre et Mercure

> Title: Cosmopolite, ou Nouvelle lumière chimique [trad. par Jean Beguin]

Do you know if the name of the translator is stated explicitely
in this edition - or just the text is identical with that published
by Beguin in 1612?

> However, I found notices about an edition with different format (In-8) in
> France (Université Louis Pasteur).
> I don't know if it is true, becouse I have not checked that copy. I think
> you can ask for more information in:
> Bibliothèque des Sciences et Techniques (Université Louis Pasteur)
> http://www-scd-ulp.u-strasbg.fr/bib/bib1.html

Thank you - I will write them and ask.

Best regards,

Rafal

Subject: ACADEMY : Nazari
Sun, 07 Jul 2002
From: Rafal T. Prinke

Dear Adam,

> Does anyone know of any articles on Nazari or his work ?

You have probably found it on the Web yourself, but just
in case: a thesis on Nazari was written at the Universicty
of Brescia:

Comincini Arturo, Giovanni battista Nazari (1533-1572?):
alchimia e profezia in un umanista bresciano del Cinquecento,
Tesi di laurea, rel. Angelo Turchini, Univerista Cattolica
di Brescia, fac. Lettere e Filosofia, A.A. 1996-1997


Best regards,

Rafal

Subject: ACADEMY : Le Cosmopolite 1691
From: Mike Dickman
Mon, 8 Jul 2002

Rafal,

The text reproduced in facsimile by J-C. Bailly (Gutenberg Reprints,
1992) seems to contain both titles. It's a version of the 1723 text
published by Laurent d'Houry.

The 'super-title', as you call it, is part of the text as reproduced, but
precedes the more detailed 'full title' page on the next page.

The text as given is as as you have given it:

> Les Oeuvres du Cosmopolite, Divisez en trois Traitez.
> Dans lesquels sont clairement expliqués les trois Principes
> des Philosophes Chymiques, sel, Soufre et Mercure

except for the following minor adjustments in the final line...

"... de la Philosophie naturelle, Sel,..."

The volume as produced by Bailly (with an introduction by C-J.
Faust) is in 8vo.

Mike Dickman

Subject: ACADEMY : Le Cosmopolite 1691
Mon, 08 Jul 2002
From: Rafal T. Prinke

Dear Mike,

Thank you for additional information.

> The text as given is as as you have given it:

> except for the following minor adjustments in the final line...
>
> "... de la Philosophie naturelle, Sel,..."

Yes, I have the same for the 1723 edition.

Can you tell me if it contains the "Lettre philosophique" with
a separate title page and pagination? How many pages?

> The volume as produced by Bailly (with an introduction by C-J.
> Faust) is in 8vo.

I am still quite confused about the formats. A quick search
shows that the definitions of the old formats differ considerably.
Because originally they refered not so much to actual size but
to the number of foldings, the size of the book depended on the
size of the original sheets on which it was printed. Thus terms
such as "small 8vo" and "large 12mo" really ovelap.

I have received a prompt and helpful reply from the Strassburg
library which Jose recommended - and it says:
"We consider it as a in 8: the sizes (lxh) are 9 x 16 cm".
In other libraries the catalogue entries have either 12mo (BL)
or 16 cm (LoC). So it may be the same edition and only
the bibliographers/librarians have different notions of the sizes.

On the other hand, I have found a precedent of a book published
simultaneously in 8vo and 12mo: the first edition of J. J. Rousseau's
_Emile_ in 1762. There even seems to be a long lasting controversy
on which of them was really first! To quote from an atiquarian
description:

It is generally accepted that the first edition was printed
in octavo and duodecimo formats from the same type, and that
the octavo issue was published slightly ahead of the 12mo.
It is not clear whether the 12mo came off the press before
the 8vo, as several prominent bibliographers believe.
Jo-Ann E. McEachern's Bibliography of the writings of Jean
Jacques Rousseau to 1800 (Oxford, 1989) represents the latest
and most exhaustive research on the subject.

In this situation, I would still be most interested to know what
Hist. Phil. Herm. III p. 141 really says concerning the two
editions of 1691.

Best regards,

Rafal

Subject: ACADEMY : Le Cosmopolite 1691
From: Adam McLean
9th July 2002

Dear Rafal,

>I am still quite confused about the formats. A quick search
>shows that the definitions of the old formats differ considerably.
>Because originally they refered not so much to actual size but
>to the number of foldings, the size of the book depended on the
>size of the original sheets on which it was printed. Thus terms
>such as "small 8vo" and "large 12mo" really ovelap.

It has been my experience that some cataloguers when
describing a book do not use the proper definitions of
4to, 8vo, 12mo, 16mo, but instead just use this as
a rough guide to the size of the book. An octavo printed
with generous margins could be cropped by the binder
and the resulting smaller book described as duodecimo.
The only way to be certain is to look at the signatures.


> It is generally accepted that the first edition was printed
> in octavo and duodecimo formats from the same type, and that
> the octavo issue was published slightly ahead of the 12mo.
> It is not clear whether the 12mo came off the press before
> the 8vo, as several prominent bibliographers believe.

In this case the printer would have to reimpose the pages, as there
is an entirely different folding. He could not print these off the
same forme of type. In the 17th century type was expensive and
it was probably cheaper to break up the type immediately
the book was printed than to keep it lying around for a reprint.
(Indeed often type was broken up after a signature was printed so
that it could be used for later signatures of the same book.)
Usually reprints in this period were actually reissues using
the same printed sheets left over from the first printing, but
with the earlier title page cut out and a new one tipped in -
that is, stuck onto a stub left of the original title page. This is
common in 17th century books. I am not sure if this continued
into the mid 18th century, and it may have been that the printer
of the Rousseau you mention could hold the page type for
the later edition in a different format.

As far as I understand, 19th century cataloguers would often just
use the terms as an indication of size. Often books were placed
in different shelves of a stack labelled quarto, octavo etc
dependent on size. Modern trained special collection librarians
would examine the signature structure before describing it as 8vo
or 12mo in a catalogue.

So it may be one of these is a 'ghost' edition, a result of the
different ways of cataloguing.

It is terribly confusing, and often the only real way to settle the question
it to have the two copies in front of you at the same time. Unfortunately
the Ferguson Collection here in Glasgow does not have these editions
or I would compare them for you.

Adam McLean

Subject: ACADEMY : Cauda Pavonis
9 Jul 2002
From: Adam McLean

Dear Michal,

I am sure Cauda Pavonis will survive.

As far as I understand it will be taken over by another
University Department. We might expect an announcement
in due course.

Cauda Pavonis is such an excellent scholarly magazine,
with a long track record and the only one addressing the
specialist subject of alchemy, that I feel sure the scholarly
community would not allow it to cease publication.

Best wishes,

Adam McLean

Subject: ACADEMY : Le Cosmopolite 1691
From: Mike Dickman
Tue, 9 Jul 2002


Hi Rafal,

> Yes, I have the same for the 1723 edition.
> Can you tell me if it contains the "Lettre philosophique" with
> a separate title page and pagination? How many pages?

*Yes, it does. Excluding the title page and 'Privilege du Roy', it's
91pp. long, 94pp including title and privilege.

> So it may be the same edition and only
> the bibliographers/librarians have different notions of the sizes.

*This is not at all impossible.

> In this situation, I would still be most interested to know what
> Hist. Phil. Herm. III p. 141 really says concerning the two
> editions of 1691.

*Can't help you there, unfortunately. My own work keeps me at this
damn machine a good twelve hours a day and I don't seem to be
able to raise it on the Gallia website.

Happy hunting!
m

Subject: ACADEMY : Le Cosmopolite 1691
Tue, 09 Jul 2002
From: Rafal T. Prinke

Dear Adam,

Thank you for your explanations.

> As far as I understand, 19th century cataloguers would often just
> use the terms as an indication of size. Often books were placed
> in different shelves of a stack labelled quarto, octavo etc
> dependent on size. Modern trained special collection librarians
> would examine the signature structure before describing it as 8vo
> or 12mo in a catalogue.

But one cannot be sure this is done in all libraries - and some
catalogues (Library of Congress being one) do not use this
notation but just give the height in centimeters.

> So it may be one of these is a 'ghost' edition, a result of the
> different ways of cataloguing.

This is my strong suspicion - but on the other hand in Bugaj's
bibliography the *only* authority for both editions is
Lenglet du Fresnoy "Histoire de la Philosophie Hermetique"
vol. III p. 141. So I also suspect that he his text may be
something like "in 12mo and in 8vo". As he was writing before
1742, I tend to believe he was using the original meaning
of the sizes (ie. foldings) rather the modern meaning which
is no longer related to foldings.

> It is terribly confusing, and often the only real way to settle the question
> it to have the two copies in front of you at the same time. Unfortunately
> the Ferguson Collection here in Glasgow does not have these editions
> or I would compare them for you.

But if you could - when your time permits - check Lenglet du Fresnoy
for what he really says there, I would be grateful. In Bugaj's
bibliography these make two separate editions - and so far
the only item that *might* be in 8vo is the one Jose brought to
my attention which is in Strassburg - and they say it *is* in 8vo,
but the phrasing suggest that they base it on size rather than
folding: "We consider it as a in 8: the sizes (lxh) are 9 x 16 cm".

Best regards,

Rafal

Subject: ACADEMY : Le Cosmopolite 1691
Tue, 09 Jul 2002
From: Rafal T. Prinke

Dear Mike,

[1723 edition reprint]
> *Yes, it does. Excluding the title page and 'Privilege du Roy', it's
> 91pp. long, 94pp including title and privilege.

Thanks a lot.

>I don't seem to be able to raise it on the Gallia website.

It is not there - but there is a lot of other things - including
Ferguson's _Bibliotheca Chemica_. It is only a pity the resolution
of their images is not better.

Best regards,

Rafal

Subject: ACADEMY : Le Cosmopolite 1691
Tue, 9 Jul 2002
From: Eugene Beshenkovsky

Dear Rafal,

Lenglet Dufresnoy lists two editions under the name of Le Cosmopolite:

Les Oeuvres du Cosmopolite, dans lesquels sont expliques les trois
principes des Philosophes Chimiques, Sel, Souffre, & Mercure, in-8o.
Paris. 1691.

Le Cosmopolite, ou nouvelle lumiere Chimique, pour servir
d'eclaircissement aux trois Principes de la nature, avec ses Lettres
Philosophiques, in-12. Paris. 1691. 2. Volumes. Edition peu commune.

Best,

Eugene Beshenkovsky

Subject: ACADEMY : Le Cosmopolite 1691
From: Stanislas Klossowski de Rola
Tue, 9 Jul 2002

Dear Rafal,

I have just returned from a two month trip in Central America and
may be able to shed further light on these works as my library
contains both the editions referred to.

The first is TRAITEZ DU COSMOPOLITE Nouvellement decouverts.
Ou apres avoir donne une idee d'une Societe de Philosophes,
on explique dans plusieurs lettres de cet Autheur la Theorie & la
Pratique des Veritez Hermetiques.
A Paris Chez Laurent d'Houry...M. DC. XCI.
238pages in-12. Idee D'une nouvelle Societe de Philosophes.
PREFACE pages3-9.
STATUTS Des Philosophes inconnus pages 10-40.
A NEW TITLEPAGE occurs on page 41:
LETTRES DE MICHEL SENDIVOGIUS
Ou de J.J.D.I.* in the margin one reads:
*C'est a dire, Jean Joachim Destininguet d'Ingrofont.
Communement appelle COSMOPOLITE,
Sur la Theorie & la Pratique de la Pierre Philosophale.
PREMIER TRAITE
De l'Art general de changer les Metaux les uns dans les autres.
The first letter (on p.42-45) is signed Michel Sendivogius and
dated A Bruxelles, le 9 Fevrier 1646. The last dated letter is the 52nd
one which ends on p.220 with the date Brussels January 22nd 1647.
The actual last one NUMBER LIII(53) (which undated)is entitled
Explication des Termes begins on p.221 and ends on p.224 with the words:
Fin des Lettres du Cosmopolite.
N.B. NONE OF THE LETTERS AFTER THE FIRST ARE SIGNED.
On page 225 begins the: SOMMAIRE ABREGE De tout ce qui
est contenu dans ces Lettres, renferme dans un Sceau ou
Hieroglife de la Societe des Philosophes inconnus. This
"SOMMAIRE DU HIEROGLIFE" ends on page 232. and the
TABLE DES MATIERES Contenues en ces Lettres. begins
on p.233 and ends on p.238.

The second volume whose main title-page reads thus is:
COSMOPOLITE OU NOUVELLE LUMIERE CHYMIQUE
Pour servir d'eclaircissement aux trois principes de la Nature,
exactement decrits dans les trois Traitez suivants.
Le Ier. De la nature en general ou il est parle du Mercure.
Le II. Du Soufre.
Le III. Du vray Sel des Philosophes.
DERNIERE EDITION, Revue & augmentee
DE LA LETTRE PHILOSOPHIQUE D'ANTOINE DUVAL Et de
l'Extrait d'une autre lettre assez curieuse. A Paris Laurent d'Houry...
M. DCC. XXIII.
The Preface begins on p.V and ends on p.xii.
The first treatise runs p.1-119 and contains besides de la Nature
en general the Sommaire and conclusion des douze traites, an
ENIGME PHILOSOPHIQUE (p.75-88) Dialogue du Mercure,
de l'Alchymiste, & de la Nature. (p.89-119) Table des Chapitres
du Cosmopolite ou nouvelle Lumiere Chymique. p.121-122.
A half title "TRAITE DU SOUFRE SECOND PRINCIPE de la Nature.
Revu & corrige de nouveau." is on p.123 the Preface au lecteur
is on p.125-135 followed by a Table des Chapitres on p.136;
the TRAITE DU SOUFRE SECOND PRINCIPE de la Nature
begins on p.137 and ends on p.241
ON P.243 the half title for the TRAITE DU SEL
TROISIEME PRINCIPE DES CHOSES MINERALES De nouveau
mis en lumiere. is found. That treatise concludes on page 333.
A New title page follows:
LETTRE PHILOSOPHIQUE, Très estimée de ceux qui se plaisent
aux Verites Hermétiques.
TRADUITE d'Allemand en François par ANTOINE DUVAL.
Avec l'Extrait d'une autre LETTRE assez curieuse sur le meme sujet.
A PARIS Chez LAURENT D'HOURY...
M. DCC.XXIII.
This letter runs from p.I-69 on the lower half of which begins the
"EXTRAIT D'UNE AUTRE LETTRE PHILOSOPHIQUE Assez
estimee parmi les Enfans de l'Art. This last letter concludes on
p.71 (pages 70 and 71 being erroneously misprinted 90 and 91.)
The last page bears the Extrait du Privilege du Roy dated December 1681.

I hope all these details are helpful I will send more if you need them.

All the very best
Stanislas Klossowski de Rola

Subject: ACADEMY : Le Cosmopolite 1691
Wed, 10 Jul 2002
From: Rafal T. Prinke

Dear Stanislas,

And one more question:

> LETTRES DE MICHEL SENDIVOGIUS
> Ou de J.J.D.I.* in the margin one reads:
> *C'est a dire, Jean Joachim Destininguet d'Ingrofont.
> Communement appelle COSMOPOLITE,

In all other quotations I have seen the name above
was "Destinguel". Is it your typo or does your copy have
this spelling?

Best regards,

Rafal

Subject: ACADEMY : Le Cosmopolite 1691
Wed, 10 Jul 2002
From: Rafal T. Prinke

Dear Eugene,

> Lenglet Dufresnoy lists two editions under the name of Le Cosmopolite:

Great many thanks for checking this for me!

> in-8o. Paris. 1691.

> in-12. Paris. 1691. 2. Volumes. Edition peu commune.

So he did say there were two editions in two formats in 1691 -
and even gives different titles.

BTW: Does "peu commune" here mean "extraordinary" or "rare"?

Best regards,

Rafal

Subject: ACADEMY : Le Cosmopolite 1691
Wed, 10 Jul 2002
From: Rafal T. Prinke

Dear Stanislas,

Thank you very, very much for the detailed description of the 1691
editions in your collection. This is really helpful. As it may be
obvious from my questions, I am compiling a new bibliography
of Sendivogius's works, trying to check the items listed
in earlier bibliographies. Once I have a preliminary version,
I will put it on the Web - I want to solve some major issues,
of which this is one. I am including a detailed description
like the one you have kindly supplied where it is available.

> I have just returned from a two month trip in Central America and
> may be able to shed further light on these works as my library
> contains both the editions referred to.
>
> The first is TRAITEZ DU COSMOPOLITE Nouvellement decouverts.

> A Paris Chez Laurent d'Houry...M. DC. XCI.
> 238 pages in-12.

> The second volume whose main title-page reads thus is:
> COSMOPOLITE OU NOUVELLE LUMIERE CHYMIQUE

> A Paris Laurent d'Houry...
> M. DCC. XXIII.

> I hope all these details are helpful I will send more if you need them.

Do you mean that the second volume you described is in-8?
Or is it also in-12 - in which case the in-8 edition, listed
by Lenglet Dufresnoy under the title "Les Oeuvres du Cosmopolite",
still seems to be a "ghost" one.

I believe that "super title" was an addtional title page
added when both volumes were bound together by the publisher.
So it may be just his error in giving the format - and
he actually listed the same edition, the first one being
bound in one volume, and the second in two - just as he says:
"in-12. Paris. 1691. 2. Volumes. Edition peu commune."

I shall be grateful for any additional comments on the
formats of the copies of these editions in your collection.

BTW: I am also including in the bibliography the names of
the libraries/collections where copies are known to be held.
Is it alright to give your name there?

Best regards,

Rafal

Subject: ACADEMY : Le Cosmopolite 1691
From: Michael Brosse
Thu, 11 Jul 2002

Dear Rafal,

I am French and could help decipher some of the terms if
you need.

For example "edition peu commune" means
"not very common edition" etc...

Michael Brosse


Subject: ACADEMY : Concept of timing in Jung ?
From: Brian Cotnoir
Thu, 11 Jul 2002

I am writing asking for help in locating the source of a concept
of timing.

I will try as best I can to clarify the particular concept of timing
as I remember reading it. It has been a while since I came
across it and I may have fused it with some other ideas as
memory (at least my memory) so often does, so please bear
with me as I try to recreate it.

The concept is that with many repetitions of a process, the
result you are seeking may appear at some point during the
repetitions. It has little to do with the technique applied (such
as multiple redistillations of alcohol to reach 95.5% purity)
but with the act itself. The result may appear in a hundred
repetitions or maybe a thousand or unhappily never. But
due to something (purity of heart, grace of God, whatever)
it happens. The source of this concept I believe was in a work
by Jung or one of his followers (not synchronicity). I don't believe
it was an idea they came up with but were rather quoting or
referring to something from another source which, to the
best of my recollection, came from arabic alchemy.
Any help in tracking this down will be appreciated.

Thanks

Brian Cotnoir

Subject: ACADEMY : Le Cosmopolite 1691
From: Stanislas Klossowski de Rola
Thu, 11 Jul 2002

Dear Rafal,

1) To begin with you are quite right it was an unforgivable typo
which led to the distortion of Destingel's name.

2) As far as the second volume described is concerned I also
omitted to report its first half-title or (faux titre as it is called in french)
which occurs on the page which was counted as roman numeral I.
since the preface begins on roman numeral V:

LES OEUVRES DU COSMOPOLITE Divisez en trois Traitez,
Dans lesquels sont clairement expliquez les trois Principes de la
Philosophie naturelle, Sel, Soufre & Mercure.

3) Let me reiterate that the edition in my possession is the
DERNIERE EDITION dated 1723 which is revised and augmented
but otherwise corresponds in all other ways to the former one.
In that connection, it might be worthwhile to quote in extenso the
Extrait du Privilege du Roy:

"Par grace & Privilege du Roy donné à saint Germain en Laye
le cinquiéme Decembre 1681, signé JUNQUIERES: Il est permis
à LAURENT D'HOURY, Marchand-Libraire à Paris, de faire
imprimer un Livre intitulé les Oeuvres du Cosmopolite, ses
Lettres, &c. pendant le tems de quinze années consecutives,
à commencer du jour qu'il sera achevé d'imprimer pour la
premiere fois: Et défenses sont faites à tous autres de l'imprimer,
vendre ni distibuer sans le consentement de l'Exposant ou
de ses ayants cause, à peine de confiscation des Exemplaires
contrefait, trois mille livres d'amende, & de tous dépens,
dommages & interets, ainsi qu'il est plus au long porté par
le dit Privilege.
Registré sur le Livre de la Communauté des Imprimeurs &
Libraires de Paris, le 23 Decembre 1681. Signé, ANGOT, Syndic."

I have given these details to show that there could also have
been an earlier edition since it is indeed very odd that the privilege
should have preceded the alleged first printing by ten years!

4) In that connection in addition to the information supplied by Eugene,
LENGLET DU FRESNOY also lists COSMOPOLITE ou nouvelle
lumiere de la Phisique naturelle, traduit par Bosnay, & imprimé à la
Haye avec le Traité du Sel de Nuisement...
He then gives: Ide,, avec le Desir desiré de Flamel,
in-8. Paris 1609. Ide,, in-8. à Paris chez Hulpeau. 1629.
L'Edition de 1609 est une des plus estimée.
Idem, in-8: à Paris chez Sebastien Chapelet. 1618.
These listings are to be found between the two references already
supplied by Eugene.

5) On the matter of sizes I stand in full agreement with Adam but here
are the PAGE dimensions of the COSMOPOLITE OU NOUVELLE LUMIERE:
90mm in width by 155mm in height. The signatures confirm it to be
an in-8. despite the bookseller's description of it as an in-12.

6) You may of course list my collection if you wish.
Let me know if I may be of further assistance be well.

All the very best always,

Stanislas Klossowski de Rola

Subject: ACADEMY : Le Cosmopolite 1691
From: Eugene Beshenkovsky
Thu, 11 Jul 2002

Dear Rafal,

Here are three other descriptions of the same. It looks like one of the
volumes of the 2 vol. edition was described twice. Regarding the formats:
very often when I consult the Bibliotheque National for something published
in 8o, according to other catalogs, I get 12o. My feeling is that this is
something to do with the French binders in 18th century. The books were put
on shelves by formats. They look nicer when they are of the same size. Just
a guess.

Best,
Eugene

P.S. Are you also interested in manuscript translations of
Sendivogius?

Cosmopolite ou nouvelle lumière chymique, pour servir d'éclaircissement aux
trois principes de la nature, excitement décrits dans les trois traitez
suivans. Le 1, traite du mercure. le 2, du soufre; &. le 3, du vray sel des
philosophes. - Dernière édition, revue & augmentée des lettres
philosophiques du mesme auteur.
1691
Publisher: Paris : Laurent d'Houry
Description: v. ; 8vo
Language: French
(Strasbourg)


Traitez Du Cosmopolite : Nouvellement découverts. Où aprés avoir donné une
idée d'une Societé dePhilosophes, on explique dans plusieurs Lettres de cét
Autheur la Theorie& la Pratique des Veritez Hermetiques / [Verf.: Michael
Sendivogius]. - [Derniere Edition, Revûë & augmentée Des Lettres
Philosophiques Du MesmeAuteur]
Autor/Herausgeber:
Sedziwój, Michal
Veröffentlicht:
Paris: d'Houry, 1691
Seiten:
238 S. ; 12o
Serien: [Cosmopolite ou Nouvelle lumière chymique / Michael Sendivogius ; 2]
(Universitätsbibliothek Mannheim)


1. Les oeuvres du cosmopolite : dans lesquels sont clairement expliquez les
trois principes chymiques, sel, soûfre [et] mercure
/ Michal J. S¸edziwój. - Dernière ed.: revue [et] augmentée. - Paris, 1691

2. Enth. außerdem: Lettres philosophiques
1691

3. Enth. außerdem: Cosmopolite : ou nouvelles lumière chymique
1691 (Göttingen, Niedersächsische Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek)


Subject: ACADEMY : Le Cosmopolite 1691
Sat, 13 Jul 2002
From: Rafal T. Prinke

Dear Eugene,

> P.S. Are you also interested in manuscript translations of
> Sendivogius?

Yes! Both translations and handwritten copies. I want to finish
the printed editions listing first - but would be grateful for any
information on MSS which are not listed by Adam. Thank you!

Best regards,

Rafal

Subject: ACADEMY : Le Cosmopolite 1691
Sat, 13 Jul 2002
From: Rafal T. Prinke

Dear Stanislas, Eugene and Michael,

Thank you very much for the additional information. My theory now
is that - as Stanislas suggested - that there was a 1681 edition
so the first 1691 entry in Langlet du Fresnoy has an error in the year.
Whether it really existed is a matter of finding a copy.

Best regards,

Rafal

Subject: ACADEMY : Double materia prima
Sat, 13 Jul 2002
From: Peter Grund

Dear All,

I am working on an edition of a lengthy alchemical compilation
in English from the 16th century. I am trying to identify the
sources of the compilation. I have not been able to identify the
source of a passage that discusses the concept of double
materia prima. Quoting Genesis 1: 1-7, the text states that
the first materia prima is water, whereas the second materia
prima is mercury, being the first matter of the bodies of the mine.
The text then proceeds with a long discussion of the properties
of mercury. Does anyone recognise this description? I would
be grateful for any references.

All the best,

Peter Grund

Subject: ACADEMY : Alexander Seton's new alias?
From: José Rodríguez Guerrero
Sun, 14 Jul 2002

Thu, 17 Jan 2002.
>I have just found Carlos Gilly's short
>article [...] where he mentions Alexander Seton
>and gives him an alias of "William Alexander".
>Does anyone know the source of it?

Dear Rafal:

It's too late and probably you found the source, but you
can find an answer in a letter to Jacob Zwinger. It was written
by Bernard G. Penot du Port.

- Basel, Öffentliche Bibliothek der Universität,
Ms. Frey-Gryaeus II.282, nº 255. [20 May 1604].

First, Jacob Zwinger sent a letter to Penot (12 August 1603, It's lost)
expounding the transmutations performed by an Englishman
in Basle, in 1603 (June or July?. I don't know). During the next
months Penot was looking for informations on this "nobili viro
Anglo". He gives more details in other letters that he sent to
Jacob Zwinger. According those documents, Penot was keeping
an eye to the Englishman in Germany (1 November 1603). Then,
Penot said he was not English but Scottish (29 January 1604).
Penot called him "Nobilis Anglus Alexander Wolsigamius"
(19 April 1604). A month later he said: "...his name is William
Alexander..." (20 May 1604). Three years later, when he traveled
to Geneva, Penot talked with "Alexander the Scotish" about
alchemy. Alexander said he went to Paris (28 January 1607).
Three months later Penot said: "... a book on his life and works
will be published in Cologne..." (10 April 1607; 24 August 1607).

You can find an extensive information in:

- EUGÈNE OLIVIER, (1992-1996), "Bernard G[illes?] Penot
(Du Port), médicine et alchimiste (1519-1617)", in:
"Chrysopoeia", nº 5, pp. 571-668, cf. pp. 625-632, 660-663.

Subject: ACADEMY : Becher papers
From: Joaquín Pérez
Tue, 16 Jul 2002

Dear All,

I am looking for additional information on the statement included in
p. 18 of the book "The Business of Alchemy", by P. H. Smith, that
four volumes of Becher's pre-1678 papers still remain in Rostock.
This material could contain valuable information on the Becher's
activities in his role as emperor adviser on alchemical matters at
the Vienna Court.

Best regards,

Joaquín

Subject: ACADEMY : Alexander Seton's new alias?
Tue, 16 Jul 2002
From: Rafal T. Prinke

Dear José,

> It's too late and probably you found the source, but you
> can find an answer in a letter to Jacob Zwinger. It was written
> by Bernard G. Penot du Port.

No, I haven't found an answer yet - and thank you very much
for this reference and very important source data.

> According those documents, Penot was keeping
> an eye to the Englishman in Germany (1 November 1603). Then,
> Penot said he was not English but Scottish (29 January 1604).
> Penot called him "Nobilis Anglus Alexander Wolsigamius"
> (19 April 1604).

Which would suggest that Seton was a native of Wolsingham
in the county of Durham. And there is indeed a village
named Seaton nearby - but considering his many other aliases,
this should be taken "cum grano salis" .

> A month later he said: "...his name is William
> Alexander..." (20 May 1604). Three years later, when he traveled
> to Geneva, Penot talked with "Alexander the Scotish" about
> alchemy. Alexander said he went to Paris (28 January 1607).

This is quite striking. The letter discovered by Julian Paulus
in which Johannes Hartmann informs Joseph Duchesne (Quercetanus)
that he learned from Jacob Zwinger about Seton's death in
his house in Basel is dated 29 September 1606. So how could
Penot talk to him early in 1607? (unless he was describing
the events which had taken place a number of months earlier).

> Three months later Penot said: "... a book on his life and works
> will be published in Cologne..." (10 April 1607; 24 August 1607).

This would suggest he was definitely dead by then - and the book
was never published, apparently?

Many thanks again and

Best regards,

Rafal

Subject: ACADEMY : Articles in ISIS
Fri, 19 Jul 2002
From: Rafal T. Prinke

Dear All,

Among the bibliographies on Adam's Website there is a listing
of articles touching on alchemy in ISIS up to [end of?] vol. 80.
I have looked through the recent tables of context on ISIS site
and noted out the few articles there were from vol. 86, no. 4
(enclosed below). Does anyone know if there was anything
relevant in between (ie. from vol. 81 no. 1 to vol. 86 no. 3)?


ROGER FRENCH: Foretelling the Future: Arabic Astrology and English
Medicine in the Late Twelfth Century 453-481 (87, No. 3, September 1996)

DEBORAH E. HARKNESS: Managing an Experimental Household: The Dees
of Mortlake and the Practice of Natural Philosophy 247-263 (Volume 88,
No. 2, June 1997)

ALLEN G. DEBUS: Chemists, Physicians, and Changing Perspectives
on the Scientific Revolution 66-82 (Volume 89, No. 1, March 1998)

PAMELA H. SMITH: Science and Taste: Painting, Passions,
and the New Philosophy in Seventeenth-Century Leiden 421-462
(Volume 90, No. 3, September 1999)

MARY QUINLAN-MCGRATH: The Foundation Horoscope(s) for St. Peter's
Basilica, Rome, 1506: Choosing a Time, Changing the Storia 716-742
(Volume 92, No. 4, June 2001)

PETER HARRISON: Curiosity, Forbidden Knowledge, and the Reformation
of Natural Philosophy in Early Modern England 265-291
(Volume 92, No. 2, June 2001)


Best regards,

Rafal

Subject: ACADEMY : Question on Flamel
Sun, 21 Jul 2002
From: Benjamin Judkins

Dear All,

I'm currently working on a paper dealing with Flamel's "Exposition
of the Hieroglyphical Figures (1624)." I'm using the Dixon edition
and am referencing Patai (1994). The main themes of the paper
are the different ways in which the figure of Abraham the Jew
have been imagined and the role of the "lost book" motif.

I wanted to include in my paper a brief "biography" of Flamel that
showed how he grew or evolved as a literary character over
time. One tradition that I'm particularly interested in that does
not appear to be prefigured in "Exposition" is the story of Flamel
being visited by an angel while in bed who showed him a copy
of a book and promised that he would be able to translated it in
part some day. Does anyone know when or where this story
first appeared in print? Do you know of any academic
discussions of the event or the motif more generally?

Also, if anyone knows of any 18th or 19th century references
to the biblical patriarch Abraham in an alchemical context,
that would be helpful too.

Thanks for your help,

Benjamin N. Judkins

Subject: ACADEMY : Alexander Seton's new alias?
From: José Rodríguez
Sun, 21 Jul 2002

>This is quite striking. The letter discovered by Julian Paulus
>in which Johannes Hartmann informs Joseph Duchesne (Quercetanus)
>that he learned from Jacob Zwinger about Seton's death in
>his house in Basel is dated 29 September 1606. So how could
>Penot talk to him early in 1607?

I am sorry, but I don't know. Could Hartmann's information
be a rumour? In a letter to J. J. Fries, dated 10 August 1604,
Jacob Zwinger commented on Seaton's probable death. Then, in
a letter to Joachim Tancke, dated 21 March 1606, Jacob Zwinger
said he suddenly appeared in Basle. I do not research into this
question. I only send you the references that I have found.

In a letter dated 27 January 1607 Penot said they were talking
"recently", so I suppose early in 1607. It is clear that Penot thought
Alexander the Scottish was not dead because in a letter dated
11 April 1608 Penot said he lives in Polland and he was really ill.

> ...the book was never published, apparently?

I think Penot could be speaking of "De Lapide Philosophorum
tractatus duodecim ... Author sum, qui Divi Leschi Genus Amo",
edited in Cologne in 1607. Of course, it is only a supposition.

Regards

José Rodríguez

Subject: ACADEMY : Alexander Seton's new alias?
Mon, 22 Jul 2002
From: Rafal T. Prinke

Dear José,

Thank you very much for more extremely interesting information.

> > So how could
> > Penot talk to him early in 1607?
>
> I am sorry, but I don't know. Could Hartmann's information
> be a rumour?

My question was rhetorical - but indeed, it is quite possible
that Seton himself spread rumours about his own death, especially
as he was chased by Friedrich I von Wirtemberg in 1605 - see
his warrant on my Web page at:

http://hum.amu.edu.pl/~rafalp/HERM/SETON/fryd1.htm

> In a letter dated 27 January 1607 Penot said they were talking
> "recently", so I suppose early in 1607. It is clear that Penot thought
> Alexander the Scottish was not dead because in a letter dated
> 11 April 1608 Penot said he lives in Polland and he was really ill.

Fascinating! So he may have actually died at Sendivogius's house
in Cracow - but 4 years later than the traditional version has it.

> > ...the book was never published, apparently?
>
> I think Penot could be speaking of "De Lapide Philosophorum
> tractatus duodecim ... Author sum, qui Divi Leschi Genus Amo",
> edited in Cologne in 1607. Of course, it is only a supposition.

Without going into the problem of authorship (Seton/Sendivogius),
can you tell me if you have the details of this edition?
In my bibliography I have only:

Dialogus Mercurii, Alchymistae et Naturae. Scriptus in Gratiam
Amici Coroades. Auctore eo, QUI DIVI LESCHI GENUS AMat.
Coloniae Imprimebat Seruatius Erffens. Anno M.DC.VII.

for that place and year.

Thank you very much again for bringing the 'Chrysopoeia' article
by Eugene Olivier to my attention. I will certainly try to get
hold of it.

Best regards,

Rafal

Subject: ACADEMY : Newton's alchemy and the law of universal gravitation?
Sun, 21 Jul 2002
From: Anne Drillick

I would like to ask a question related to research I am doing
for a scholarly article. The article I am writing traces the role
of the mandala archetype in the development of astronomy.

Here is my question: How did Newton's study of alchemy
influence his development of the law of universal gravitation?
In particular, are there alchemical sources for the mandala
symbolism inherent in this law: attraction from a center.
As you may know, Jung, who wrote extensively about the
mandala archetype, was also very interested in alchemy.

Sincerely,
Anne Drillick

Subject: ACADEMY : Alexander Seton's new alias?
From: José Rodríguez Guerrero
Sun, 28 Jul 2002

>Without going into the problem of authorship (Seton/Sendivogius),
>can you tell me if you have the details of this edition?
>In my bibliography I have only:

>Dialogus Mercurii, Alchymistae et Naturae. Scriptus in Gratiam
>Amici Coroades. Auctore eo, QUI DIVI LESCHI GENUS AMat.
>Coloniae Imprimebat Seruatius Erffens. Anno M.DC.VII.
>
>for that place and year.

Dear Rafal T. Prinke:

I was mistaken in that title. Your bibliography is right. I think Penot
could be referring to that work printed in Cologne in 1607.

Good luck in the search,

José Rodríguez Guerrero.

Subject: ACADEMY : Newton's alchemy and the law of universal gravitation?
Sun, 21 Jul 2002
From: Adam McLean

Dear Anne Drillick,

You might try

Castillejo, David.
The Expanding Force in Newton's Cosmos as shown in his
unpublished papers.
Madrid 1981

This draws more from Newton's prophecies and numerology than his
alchemy, but it does give some good background material.

There was a discussion recently of Newton's gravitation and
alchemical ideas through some scholarly papers. I think these
were referenced in previous discussions on this group or on
one of the earlier discussion groups I hosted. You can see
all the archives through the appropriate section on the alchemy
web site.

Adam McLean

Subject: ACADEMY : Newton's alchemy and the law of universal gravitation?
From: Susanna Åkerman
Mon, 29 Jul 2002

Dear Anne,

I did a little search on www.google.com on Newton Boehme Gravitation
and found a lot of hits. Apparently William Law was first to state that
Newton got his ideas on gravitation from reading the Cambridge
Platonist Henry More on Jacob Boehme. Apparently Blavatsky
says this and theosophists still discuss it.. I have not found the
actual passage from Morgenröthe in Aufgang or Mysterium Magnum
in which the idea is supposed to be plausibly stated. Ernst Benz
in his History of electricity says that Newton got ideas of attraction
and repulsion from Boehme. The Boehme conception also pops
up in modern Newton research, but I have no exact citation to build
on. However I found a page with some German speaking references
that may be hard for you to to find. Perhaps you can find an English
source if you look around:


Popp, Karl Robert: Jakob Böhme und Isaac Newton, Leipzig 1935.
In: Studien und Bibliographien zur Gegenwartsphilosophie,12
Poppe, Kurt: Über den Ursprung der Gravitationslehre. Jakob
Böhme - Henry More - Isaac Newton. In: Zeitschrift für
Anthroposophie und Dreigliederung, 34 (1964) S.313-340

This is just one page that might be worth looking at

http://www.inf.hs-zigr.de/~sepiroth/jb/jb_02.htm


Susanna Akerman


Subject: ACADEMY : Newton's alchemy and the law of universal gravitation?
From: Susanna Åkerman
Mon, 29 Jul 2002

Dear Anne,

I asked my former tutor Richard Popkin who just told me the
following, probably meaning the William Law Boehme edition:

"...All that comes to mind is that something about Newton's debt
to Jakob Boehme is mentioned in a volume that the Clark library
in Los Angeles has of an English presentation of Boehme's
philosophy in the middle of the C18. I cannot recall who that author
may be. Does Thomas Taylor sound possible? I think you
must have seen the book, it has pop-outs of various features of
Boehme's philosophy. Anyway, what I think I recall is that the
author recounts that Newton's niece's husband told him that he
had found a page of Jakob Boehme about gravity in Newton's
papers when the great man died. I also recall that Betty Jo
Dobbs hoped we would find this in the Jerusalem collection,
which we did not..."

So on this issue even the masters wonder!

Susanna Akerman


Subject: ACADEMY : Newton's alchemy and the law of universal gravitation?
From: Susanna Åkerman
Tue, 30 Jul 2002

Dear Anne,

I found this this morning and there probably is more:

Selected mystical writings of William Law. : Ed. with notes
and twenty-four studies in the mystical theology of William Law
and Jacob Boehme and an enquiry into the influence of
Jacob Boehme on Isaac Newton by Stephen Hobhouse.
Foreword by Aldous Huxley. 2. ed., rev. London (1938).