Alchemy Academy archive
December 1999

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Subject: ACADEMY : The Romance of the Rose-Cross
Date: Wed, 01 Dec 1999
From: Susanna Åkerman

Michael Martin wrote:
>Two things that puzzle me as far as pre-1610 dates go are:
>
>1) The "'Ur' "Chemical Wedding" attributed to Andrae from
>about 1601-02. Did this document refer to CRC, or was he
>added later?

I have no information on the Ur Chemical wedding and have
not seen it. But if CRC is not mentioned in it it would be interesting
and sensational. Do you have any reference to it? In Montgomery
perhaps?

>2) The date of "1604" which appears..."
>Certainly, this would have been the year of the finding of CRC's
>vault. It also coincided with two separate super novas. But, why this
>year, especially if CRC is a fictional character? Wouldn't 1610 (or
>1614, etc) have served better?

I believe 1604 is focused on as it it coincides with the passsage
of the great conjunctions to the "trigono igneo that shall give us the
last light" (Fama), based on Abu Mashar's ninth century astrological
theory of the regular passage of the conjunctions of Jupiter and
Saturn from one zodiacal sign to another. The passage from the
watery to the fiery trigon takes place in 1583 and then in Dec-Jan
1603/4 and was the seventh of such passages (to Aries in 1583 to
Sagittarius in 1603 and significantly to Leo in 1623) since creation
according to Johannes Kepler's Mysterium Cosmographicum,
recently published when the Fama appeared. The scheme had
been used by Cyprian Leowitz in 1563 in Prague prohecying on
Bohemia but without Kepler's elegant theory.

P.S. Geheime figuren contains a Lion, 1604 and an old man in a
cave, typical RC elements. Am I thinking of the right picture?

Susanna Akerman

Subject: ACADEMY : The Romance of the Rose-Cross
Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999
From: Ed Thompson

Michael Martin wrote:

(1) wondering if Andreae's 'Ur-Chemical Wedding' refers to CRC:

The short answer is that no copy is known to exist, so no-one
knows.

(3) if anyone doubts Andreae's central role in Rosicrucianism:
John Warwick Montgomery sets out the case very fully in "Cross
and Crucible: Johann Valentin Andreae (1586-1654) Phoenix of the
Theologians" Archives Internationales d'Histoire des Ideas 55
2 vols (The Hague, 1973).
Montgomery's interpretation of the Chemical Wedding has been
strongly challenged by Adam McLean, but that doesn't have any
direct bearing on the arguments as to whether Andreae was involved
in writing the Fama and Confessio.

Ed Thompson

Subject: ACADEMY : Kutna Hora, Paracelsus, Mining Laws
Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999
From: Michal Pober

Dear Jerry Bujas,

> The word Kutna is spelled with "accent grave" over "a" (Kutna) which
> is an adjective derived from an atiquated word "kutat" - to dig.
> Kutna Hora is then a "mountain where digging takes place".

Well excuse me for being picky.. but the accent on the a in Kutna
is an acute accent - what it actually does in Czech is to make
it a long a.

And my best dictionary, a 45 mb effort, defines the verb kutat thus:

prospect
work a mine

Which brings me back to my original definition a while ago of
'mining hill'..

If anyone can parse the Kutten part of the German, Kuttenberg,
that would be of interest!

Best Regards,
Michal

Subject: ACADEMY : Paracelsus and Borges
Date: Wed, 1 Dec 1999
From: Michal Pober

Dear Catherine,

Re the Borges story, 'Paracelsus' Rose' it was in a Czech Book
Club Edition entitled 'Mirror and Mask', a compilation from a
number of Borges' works including 'Fictions', 'El Aleph', 'The Book
of Sand'. This story was from a book with a title like 'The 25th August
and Other Tales'.

Near the conclusion of the story a character who has been referred
to only as 'the student' is revealed as Johannes Grisebach in the
following loose translation: 'Why should Johannes Grisebach be
the one to discover that under Paracelsus' mask there is nothing'...

Best Regards,
Michal Pober

Subject: ACADEMY : The Romance of the Rose-Cross
Date: Tue, 30 Nov 1999
From: Michael Thomas Martin

Susanna Akerman wrote:

> P.S. Geheime figuren contains a Lion, 1604 and an old man in a
> cave, typical RC elements. Am I thinking of the right picture?
>
Yes, ma'am.

As for the "'Ur' Chemical Wedding", it is probably lost. But the fact
that the one we have is so much more rich than the "Fama" or the
"Confessio" makes me believe that it is not by the same hand as either
of these. I also have a hard time believing a fifteen year-old could
write something that rich and that profound, regardless of how different
education was in those days. I do believe that the text was extensively
reworked prior to publication - but by whom? Andrae, if the information
we have is correct, was on to other things by the time of the "furor."

Regards,

Michael Martin
Subject: ACADEMY : Kutna Hora, Paracelsus, Mining Laws
Date: Thu, 2 Dec 1999
From: Michal Pober

Dear Dusan Djordjevic Mileusnic,

Apologies for not responding sooner but I was off on a
personal quest in Budapest.
I think that the Kutna does come from the verb kutat which
I wrote of in another message.

>Two alchemists are mentioned in this context - Krystof Putz and
>David Wolfram. Anything on these names?

I have also found mentions of them but will try get back on this
in a couple of days.

>By the way, as I recall, you mentioned Ercker in some of your
>previous messages. There is an interesting site with images from
>Ercker`s book on metallurgy on
>www.library.upenn.edu/etext/collections/smith/ercker/ .

Thank you so much for this!
I downloaded the lot..

As far as the crossover with alchemy is concerned perhaps
the distillation of aqua regia seemed the most interesting process.

With Best Regards,

Michal Pober
Subject: ACADEMY : Paracelsus and Borges
Date: Thu, 2 Dec 1999
From: Catherine Fox-Anderson

Dear Michal,

Thank you - there are so many Borgian collections that
it's hard to find specific stories sometimes. If it
was in Czech, my best friend could help me with it -
she'll be in Prague for the holidays.

Can you recommend the new Alchemy Museum, and do
you have an address?

Best wishes,
Catherine
Subject: ACADEMY : The alchemical arch or gate of Rivodutri

From: Adam McLean
Date: 3rd Dec 1999

An Italian correspondent has written to me recently to tell me of a arch
or doorway in Rivodutri (which I believe is near Rome).
This has various carvings upon it which, it is suggested, may have an
alchemical import. It may be in some ways similar to the Porta
Magica in Rome.


Does anyone have any information on this 'alchemical gateway'
in Rivodutri ?

Details of this have now been published in a book

Partini, Anna Maria LA PORTA ERMETICA DI RIVODUTRI
Claudio Lanzi. Casa Editrice : Simmetria (Roma) 1999

Anna Maria Partini s well known for her editions of alchemical
books and especially for her research into Palombara.

Adam McLean
Subject: ACADEMY : Modern Alchemy and fascism
From: Stanislas Klossowski de Rola
Date: Tue, 7 Dec 1999

Dear Jose,
I am puzzled by your charges of "neo-nazism" concerning the New
Acropolis group which you referred to. Their aims, in sharp contrast
to Hitler's "Mein Kampf", appear to be directed above all against
racism. Every article I've read including John Gilbert's refutes nazi
style positions.

Thank you
Stanislas Klossowski de Rola
Subject: ACADEMY : Chrysomander
Date: Wed, 8 Dec 1999
From: Eugene Beshenkovsky

Greetings to all,

I am trying to reconstruct a Russian Rosicrucian library which was
burned in 1793.

One of the destroyed books (18 thousand volumes altogether) was:

[Chrysomander, eine allegorische und satyrische Geschichte etc.
Bernburg & Quedlinburg: 1774. 128 p. ; 8vo]

Kayser, Romane, p. 26; BMC, 39, 122.

It was translated into Russian.

[Khrizomander, allegoricheskaia i satiricheskaia povest',
razlichnago ves'ma vazhnago soderzhaniia. Perevod s nemetskago
[A. A. Petrova]. Izhdiveniem N. Novikova i Kompanii. Moskva: Univ.
Tip., u N. Novikova, 1783. 276 p. ; 8vo]

SK, 3, no. 8066.

Surprisingly, it is not listed in standard Masonic bibliographies like
Kloss and Wolfstieg:

Wolfstieg, A. Bibliographie der freimaurerischen Literatur. Burg, 1911-
1912, 2 vols.

Kloss, Georg. Bibliographie der Freymaurerey und der mit ihr in
Verbindung gesetzen geheimen Gesellschaften. Systematisch
zusammengestellt von Georg Kloss ... Graz, 1970 (Reprint of 1844
edition).

Is anything known about this novel? It describes some adventures of
Mercury, which is actually a description of a chemical reaction.

Many thanks,

Eugene Beshenkovsky
Subject: ACADEMY : Some queries
From: Eve Sinaiko
Date: Thu, 9 Dec 1999

Once again I turn to this list with a number of small (and tiresome
queries). Many thanks to all for fascinating posts.

1. I wonder if anyone on the list can identify the poem (or perhaps letter?)
by Arthur Rimbaud in which this phrase occurs: "The wrinkled peace that
alchemy etches on the great studious brows." (The translation from the
French may be inaccurate.)

2. Also, in the Alchemy website, there is a text by Zosimos of Panopolis
(www.levity.com/alchemy/zosimos.html) that begins "The composition of the
waters, and the movement, and the growth, and the removal and restitution of
bodily nature, and the splitting off of the spirit from the body, and the
fixation of the spirit on the body are not operations with natures alien one
from the other, but, like the hard bodies of metals and the moist fluids of
plants, are One Thing, of One Nature, acting upon itself..." Does anyone know
the title of the treatise from which this comes, the location of the document
(or perhaps it was published in a later book), and/or the date of the
translation & name of translator?

3. Is the date known--or even the century--in which the Golden Tractate of
Hermes Trismegistus was first published in the West? I have only the date of
John Yarker's edition, 1886.

4. Finally, is the date of A.E. Waite's translation of Basil Valentine's
Triumphal Chariot of Antimony known?

Many thanks and best wishes to all for the new year.

Eve Sinaiko
Subject: ACADEMY : Queries concerning alchemical glossaries and dictionaries
Date: Thu, 09 Dec 1999
From: Mike Dickman

Somebody recently asked concerning glossaries and dictionaries dealing with
alchemy. There are three currently available in French:

- A-J Pernetty Dictionaire Mytho-Hermetique [ARCHE] Milan, 1980
- Guillaume Salmon Dictionaire Hermetique [GUTENBERG REPRINTS] Paris, 1979
- Kamala Jnana Dictionaire de Philosophie Alchimique[EDITIONS DU SPHINX]
Laroque, 1999

The last-named author is, of course, one of the alter-egos of Roger Caro.

Hope this is of some help.

m
Subject: ACADEMY : Some queries
From: Jean-Pierre Valjean
Date: Thu, 09 Dec 1999

Madame Eve,

Vous trouverez a; http://www.studio-aeiou.com/comments.html

Arthur Rimbaud

VOYELLES

A noir, E blanc, I rouge, U vert, O bleu : voyelles,
Je dirai quelque jour vos naissances latentes :
A, noir corset velu de mouches éclatantes
Qui bombinent autour des puanteurs cruelles,

Golfes d'ombres ; E, candeurs des vapeurs et des tentes,
Lances des glaciers fiers, rois blancs, frissons d'ombelles ;
I, pourpres, sang craché, rire des lèvres belles
Dans la colère ou les ivresses pénitentes ;

U, cycles, vibrements divins des mers virides,
Paix des pâtis semés d'animaux, paix des rides
Que l'alchimie imprime aux grands fronts studieux ;

O, suprême Clairon plein des strideurs étranges,
Silences traversés des Mondes et des Anges :
- O l'Oméga, rayon violet des Ses yeux !
Subject: ACADEMY : Some queries
Date: Thu, 09 Dec 1999
From: Henrik Bogdan

Dear Eve,

In response to your 4th query:

>4. Finally, is the date of A.E. Waite's translation of Basil Valentine's
>Triumphal Chariot of Antimony known?

Waite's translation was published in 1893, under the full title of

"The Triumphal Chariot of Antimony. By Basilius Valentinus. With
the Commentary of Theodore Kerckringius, A Doctor of Medicine.
Being the Latin Version Published at Amsterdam in the year 1685
Translated into English, with a biographical preface. (James Elliott
and Co., Temple Chambers, Falcon Court, Fleet Street, E. C. 1893)

Hope this might be of any assistance,

Best wishes.

Henrik Bogdan
Subject: ACADEMY : Moderm alchemy and fascism
From: Jose Rodríguez
Date: Thu, 9 Dec 1999

>I am puzzled by your charges of "neo-nazism" concerning the New
>Acropolis group which you referred to. Their aims, in sharp contrast
>to Hitler's "Mein Kampf", appear to be directed above all against
>racism. Every article I've read including John Gilbert's refutes nazi
>style positions.

Dear Stanislas,

I`m sorry but I can't understand the methods of New Acropolis. I can't
explain this to you because I have never joined a sectarian group :-)

Catherine is really interested in Spanish alchemy, she was asking
about modern alchemy and fascism, and Nueva Acrópolis is a group
using alchemy and fascist ideas for many years in Spain. It is not my
own and free opinion, you can find references in all ULR address
that I sent:

http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Parthenon/1348/ACROPOLIS.html
http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/Cafe/3627/lasecta.htm
http://moon.act.uji.es/~roc/a12/a12.html
http://moon.act.uji.es/~roc/a12/d16.htm
http://moon.act.uji.es/~roc/a12/es_na.htm
http://moon.act.uji.es/~roc/a12/or_na.htm
http://moon.act.uji.es/~roc/a12/aa12.htm

Here there are many references to Nueva Acrópolis methods in Spain:
fascism (praises to Francisco Franco...), neo-nazism (racism, scorn
against women...), etc.

Besides there are web sites and books including a lot of factual dates
about the status of the Nueva Acrópolis sect in Spain:

Books:
- Rodríguez, P. (1985). Las sectas hoy y aquí. Barcelona: Ed. Tibidabo
- Rodríguez, P. (1989). El poder de las sectas. Barcelona: Ediciones B
- Rodríguez, P. (1991).Traficantes de esperanzas. Barcelona: Ediciones B.
- Varios. (1994). Grupos totalitarios y sectarismo. Ponencias del II
Congreso Internacional. Barcelona: AIS.

Web sites:
- http://moon.inf.uji.es/~roc/
This is a web site called "The Amazing Sects' World". It informs about the
sects in Spain and provide a lot of information concerning Nueva
Acrópolis fascist and neo-nazi ideas.

- http://personal.redestb.es/ais/
This is the AIS web site. AIS is the Spanish society giving advice and
assessment on Spanish destructive sects. The AIS sects index
includes Nueva Acrópolis (see: http://personal.redestb.es/ais/fitxes.htm ).
You can send an e-mail to AIS if you need more information
concerning New Acrópolis:
ais@mx3.redestb.es

I don't make the charge of "neo-nazism" against Nueva Acrópolis. I only
transcribe the opinion of specialist societies like AIS.

Regards,

José Rodríguez
Subject: ACADEMY : Chrysomander
From: Gleb Butuzov
Date: Fri, 10 Dec 1999

Dear Eugene,

Yes, Chrysomander is a purely alchemical allegory and was
translated into Russian by request of Novikov, owing to whom
many hermetic books were translated and partially published in
Moscow between 1783 and 1787 ( among them Corpus Hermeticum,
Kirchweger's 'Aurea Catena Homeri', 'Psalterium chymicum' by
pseudo-Paracelsus, Sendivogius' 'Novum Lumen Chymicum',
'Utriusque cosmi maioris scilicet et minoris metaphysica' by Fludd,
Weigel's 'Himmlich Manna, Azoth et Ignis', e.t.c.). They were not
necessarily masonic, for Novikov - as well as many other Russian
rosicrucians of his circle - was generally interested in hermeticism.

Unfortunately, I also have no other information about this book.

Best regards.

Gleb Butuzov.
Subject: ACADEMY : Paracelsus and the Virgin Mary
From: Penny Bayer
Date: Fri, 10 Dec 1999

In his book on Paracelsus (State University of New York, 1997,
pp. 80-3), Andrew Weeks describes how, in the Liber Sancta Trinitate,
Paracelsus made a place for a higher prototype of the Virgin Mary
in the divine family of Father, Son and Holy Ghost. This higher
prototype was a "goddess" with whom God the father generated
the divine son in heaven. She was a celestial queen, an eternally
pure being.

I am wondering whether this interesting imagery bears any
relationship to the figure of the Queen in famous alchemical sequences
such as the Rosarium Philosophorum and the Splendor Solis. The
latter has mythical associations with Paracelsus through the legend
of Salomon Trismosin. It would be useful to know if anyone has already
addressed this question, or to have any general thoughts on the
matter.

Best wishes
Penny Bayer
Subject: ACADEMY : Moderm alchemy and fascism
Date: Fri, 10 Dec 1999
From: Catherine Fox-Anderson

Dear Jose and Stanislas,

Thank you both very much for your input. As I have
been writing my own thesis, of alchemical symbols in
hispanic literature, this theme came to my attention
and could not be ignored as a possible motivating
force in the author of one of the works I am studying.
In my chapter on literary/socio/historical influences
on these authors, the question must be faced, as
distasteful as I personally find it. While the
academic community I am working in accepts my thesis
on the symbolism and considers it original and valid,
it is legitimately concerned about any polemic that
may be started by questions about links to neo-fascism
and esoterism in this century and at this time in the
literature. I consider it a fair and legitimate
question, but it is fearful, complex territory, and
one must move carefully; I shall not , and would not
commit anything to paper until certain. I am a
beginning scholar and am no expert, but have tried to
approach this study by asking lots of questions, and
by double checking answers offered. I have come to
love alchemy, and have kept in mind Adam's reminder to
consider alchemy on it's own terms, not placing
outside values or points of view on it - and for this
approach to the symbols, it has been suggested to me
that I've gotten too close to the topic. Perhaps, but
I stand by this method. No literary thesis is worth
it's weight if it doesn't consider the
socio-historical context of the work (I'm currently
reading Mar Rey Bueno's work on alchemy in the court
of Carlos II; Yates' Rosicrucian Enlightenment; and
Eliade's light-filled works on Yoga and alchemy). I
have been afraid, not knowing who I'm dealing with in
terms of the fascism/alchemy question, and most have
avoided or been evasive regarding my queries. It is
to me a perversion of the Art for ends we are well
aware of - I'm the daughter of a World War II veteran
and that is a moral legacy I'm proud of. The study of
alchemy has enriched my own spiritual path. The
recent focus on Paracelsus in the forum has of course
been of related interest, and I'm grateful for all
contributions to my questions. I hope there are plans
to translate Mar Rey Bueno's work to English as I
think it is very good; some of the best modern
research on alchemy in Spain seems to be coming from
science departments, which is fitting given Spain's
long legacy of botanical studies in their monasteries.
Again, I thank both of you for the personal time you
have given me over this last year, and wish you well
in your own projects. May your year's end and new
year be filled with blessings and peace.

El antiguo Chaos, a mi parecer,
De quatro Elementos bien conglutinado
A este Compuesto es asemejado
Quando diviso se viene a facer
El Cielo y la Tierra por si viene a ser
Una Quinta esencia, esencia de todo,
Porque esta Materia es en atal modo,
Ca todas las cosas viene a componer.
(Luanco, p.174-175, Alfonso el Sabio)

Catherine
Subject: ACADEMY : Finis Gloriae Mundi
From: Jerry Bujas
Date: Fri, 10 Dec 1999

Fulcanelli's last book Finis Gloriae Mundi, published by Mirabilis,
was to be shipped on December 3rd.

Has anyone obtained it yet?

Jerry Bujas
Subject: ACADEMY : Chrysomander
Date: Fri, 10 Dec 1999
From: Rafal Prinke

Gleb Butuzov wrote:

> translated into Russian by request of Novikov, owing to whom
> many hermetic books were translated and partially published in
> Moscow between 1783 and 1787 ( among them Corpus Hermeticum,
> Kirchweger's 'Aurea Catena Homeri', 'Psalterium chymicum' by
> pseudo-Paracelsus, Sendivogius' 'Novum Lumen Chymicum',

Do you perhaps have bibliographic data of the translation of
Sendivogius (this and any other works) into Russian? I am compiling
his bibliography and have none of the Russian editions listed.

Best regards,

Rafal
Subject: ACADEMY : Queries concerning alchemical glossaries and dictionaries
From: Stanislas Klossowski de Rola
Date: Fri, 10 Dec 1999

The original edition of the "Dictionnaire Hermetique contenant
L'Explication desTermes, Fables, Enigmes, Emblemes & manieres de
parler des vrais Philosophes. Accompagné de deux Traitez singuliers
& utiles aux curieux de l'Art. Par un Amateur de la Science" Paris
Laurent d'Houry 1695

is not by Salmon as is erroneously believed but by the author of

"Le Filet d'Ariadne Pour Entrer avec seureté dans le Labirinthe de la
Philosophie Hermetique"

published the very same year by the same publisher.
Indeed on the second page of the "Avertissement" the author states
the following:

"...j'ai fait exprés un Dictionaire qui explique fort nettement
ce qui est le plus difficile, afin de satisfaire en quelque façon les
Curieux, et desabuser ceux qui se ruinent inconsiderément, voulant
travailler sur une Science qu'ils n'ont jamais apprise, & par
consequent qu'ils ne peuvent bien sçavoir, ni mettre en usage."

Translation: I have made on purpose a Dictionary which explains
quite clearly that which is most difficult, in oder to satisfy in some
manner the Inquirers and to disabuse those who recklessly ruin
themselves, in wanting to work upon a Science which they have never
learnt, & which in consequence, they cannot know well, nor put in
practice.

Now, the anonymous author of "Le Filet d'Ariadne" is not Heinrich
von Batsdorff (as it has also been erroneously stated), but Gaston
Le Doux dit de Claves, Amateur des Veritez Hermetiques, who authored
the "Traité Philosophique de laTriple Preparation de l'Or et de l'Argent"
and "De la Droite et Vraie maniere de produire la Pierre Philosophique,
ou le Sel argentifique & aurifique" both these titles are to be found,
(in all complete copies of the original edition) following the above
mentioned Dictionaire Hermetique, albeit with a separate titlepage
for the first treatise and separate pagination beginning with the
titlepage of the first.

I hope you will find this information useful.

All the very best always,

Stanislas Klossowski de Rola
Subject: ACADEMY : Some queries
From: Iain Jamieson
Date: Sat, 11 Dec 1999

Dear Eve

Some answers, I hope, to your questions:

> 2. Also, in the Alchemy website, there is a text by Zosimos of Panopolis
> (www.levity.com/alchemy/zosimos.html) that begins "The composition
> of the waters, and the movement, ...

This is the famous 'Visions of Zosimos' which so attracted Jung and
his followers. It is usually titled 'Of Virtue', and is so translated by F.
Sherwood Taylor, but as Jung correctly points out (Alchemical Studies,
London, 1968, p. 59), a better translation would be 'On our Art',
corresponding to the Latin 'ars nostra'. Some translations are:

J.M. Stillman, The Story of Alchemy and Early Chemistry, Dover Pubs.,
New York, 1960, pp.162- 165 (partial).

C.G Jung, Alchemical Studies, Routledge & Kegan Paul, London, 1968,
pp.59 ff. (partial with extensive commentary).

F. Sherwood Taylor, The Alchemists, Granada, St Albans, 1976,
pp. 57-60 (complete, from Ambix, 1, 1937, 88-92).

Jack Lindsay, The Origins of Alchemy in Graeco-Roman Egypt, Muller,
London, 1970, pp. 344 ff. (complete with commentary).

All these are translated from the edition of Berthelot.

> 3. Is the date known--or even the century--in which the Golden Tractate of
> Hermes Trismegistus was first published in the West? I have only the date
> of John Yarker's edition, 1886.

This was first printed as 'Septem tractatus s. capitula Trismegisti aurei',
in the 'Ars chemica', Argentorati, 1567, pp. 7-31. The work is probably
Arabic in origin.

> 4. Finally, is the date of A.E. Waite's translation of Basil Valentine's
> Triumphal Chariot of Antimony known?

This appeared as:

The Triumphal Chariot of Antimony ... with the Commentary of Theodore
Kerckringus, a Doctor of Medicine. Being the Latin Version published at
Amsterdam in the Year 1685 translated into English, with a Biographical
Preface. London, James Elliott, 1893. pp.xxxiv, 208.

Waite, as with other texts in this series, acted as editor, and did not
translate the work.

Best wishes,

Iain Jamieson
Subject: ACADEMY : Finis Gloriae Mundi
Date: Sun, 12 Dec 1999
From: Mike Dickman

Yes, I've got it.

Be it said that Mme. Béatrice Canseliet, Canseliet's daughter, is quite
categorical as to this book and assures us (if assurance we needed)
that it is a fake.

The FF250 asked for it, is just a trifle exorbitant, but c'est la vie.

m
Subject: ACADEMY : Finis Gloriae Mundi
Date: Sun, 12 Dec 1999
From: Pierre Stibia

I was present to the last Colloquium organized in Paris in homage
to the memory of M. Eugene Canseliet.

During this colloquium, Mrs. Beatrix Canseliet, his daughter, claimed
this "Finis Gloria Mundi" is in fact an apocrypha.

I read very a few of this book but my opinion and deepest feeling
are this book has nothing to do with the two previous books written
by Fulcanelli.

We must be very cautious with that seems to be a commercial
operation .

For more information on this "affair", see

Best regards to all.

Pierre Stibia
Subject: ACADEMY : The Rose Cross and Phillip Sidney
Date: Mon, 13 Dec 1999
From: Michael Srigley

Dear Friends,
In the discussions concerning 'The Rose Cross and Sir Philip
Sidney', Michael Martin speculated on the existence of "some
kind of humanistic/religious movement that Sidney may have been
involved with", and Robert Vanloo drew attention to the friendship
between Duplessis-Mornay and Sidney and the former's awareness
of the Rose-Cross by 1611. It might be worth considering the semi-secret
humanist grouping known as Domus Charitatis or the Family Love as
a possible environment for the formative stages of the Rosicrucian
movement.

This was a non-sectarian movement made up of both Catholics and
Protestants. It was led by Barrefeldt (or Hiel) in the latter part of the
sixteenth century, and prominent in it was the humanist Dutch printer,
Christopher Plantin. Plantin was a friend both of DuPlessis Mornay
and of Hubert Languet and safeguarded Languet's private papers
at his death. In a letter sent by Languet from Antwerp in October,
1579, to Sidney, Languet regrets a confusion between the Anabaptists
and the Family of Love ("Domus Charitatis") which has darkened the
name of the Family, and goes on: "I shall enquire more diligently into
these matters, and what I discover I shall fully describe to you; for
several years I have noticed in you a desire to learn of the mysteries
that are concealed under the name of the House of Love". He gave
Plantin's printing works in Antwerp as one of two addresses to be used
by Sidney.

L. Voet has pointed out that Philippe du Plessis-Mornay, Sidney's friend,
George Buchanan, the Scottish humanist, Daniel Rogers, diplomat and
poet and cousin of Ortelius, the geographer, Ortelius himself and
Languet all belonged to Plantin's inner circle. Perhaps the most important
link between the Familists and the Rosicrucians would be John Dee.
Among Dee's friends was Giacomo Aconzio (Acontius), then living in
exile in England, whose writings circulated in the Sidney circle. He was
reputed to be a Familist. As Peter French wrote, "Dee may have gleaned
some of his religious ideas from the secret sect known as the Family
of Love." Dee was on intimate terms of friendship with the Sidney group
and with Rogers and Ortelius. In Ortelius's Latin correspondence there is
a letter from Guillaume Postel saying that he is aware of the existence of
the Family of Love and is in full agreement with its goals. Ortelius's
'Album amicorum' containing contributions from scholars and humanists
all over Europe is preserved at Pembroke College, Cambridge. Alas,
I have still not found time to look at this Album and list the names in it.

Maybe it was some such loose-knit group of humanists, scholars and
statesmen, eirenist and ecumenical in tendency, that provided a
congenial soil for the seed of Rosicrucianism to germinate in. The
question, however, remains, as Susanna wrote, as to whether such a
background would have been incidental or essential for forming
Rosicrucianism.

Best Wishes,

Michael Srigley

Subject: ACADEMY : Chrysomander
Date: Mon, 13 Dec 1999
From: Eugene Beshenkovsky

Dear Rafal,

Here are two 18th century translations I am aware of.

Best wishes,

Eugene Beshenkovsky

SETON, ALEXANDER, d. 1604
Novoe khimicheskoe svetilo, iz istochnika natury i ruchnago opyta
pocherpnutoe: s prisovokupleniem Filosofskoi pritchi i Razgovora mezhdu
Alkhimistom, Merkuriem i Naturoiu. Sochinenie Mikhaila Sendivogiia.
Moskva: Tip. I. Lopukhina, 1785. [8], 146, [2] p. ; 8vo]

SK, 3, no. 6456. Translated from: Sendivogius, Michael. Novum lumen
chemicum, aus dem Brunnen der Natur durch handangelegte Erfahrung bewiesen
: Nebst dem Gespräche des Mercurii, und dem Tractat vom Schwefel, und
denen 55 Briefen. Nürnberg, 1766. BVB. Attributed to Setton by the
compilers of 'The Uninon Catalog of the 18th century Russian
Publicat'ions" citing Ferguson, 2, p. 369, 374-377. as authority.

SCOTT, MICHAEL
Novoi sposob, kak uznat' mozhno kazhdago cheloveka svoistva po ego
slozheniiam, sochinen na latinskom iasyke Mikhailom Scoti, i pri nem dva
razgovora ne izvestnago sochinitelia, iz koikh v odnom razgovarivaiut
Merkurii, Alkhimik i Priroda, a v drugom Alkhimik, Sera i Saturn, k
kotorym togo zhe sochinitelia prilozhena eshche Pritcha, ili Filosofskaia
zagadka. Pereveden s latinskago iazyka. [Moskva: Senatskaia tip.], 1781.
159 p. ; 8vo.

SK, 3, no. 6533. Combines Scott's 'Physiognomia' and several tracts of
Sendivogius. I have not been able to find a publication (in Latin) in
which both authors are present.
Subject: ACADEMY : Geheime Figuren
Date: Mon, 13 Dec 1999
From: Eugene Beshenkovsky

Greetings to all!

I am making a description of a private collection of Rosicrucian
manuscripts and books of 18th-early 19th centuries. It contains a
manuscript of L.-C. de Saint-Martin (translation? of 'Drey Principia')
and a complete? set of 'Geheime Figuren der Rosenkreuzer aus
dem 16ten und 17ten Jahrhundert. Altona und Hamburg: J.D.A. Eckhardt,
1785-1788. It looks different from all descriptions I've seen.

There are 2 parts: [1] Title page, 15 unnumbered leaves. In Folio. [2]
Title page, 16 unnumbered leaves. In Folio. Both with hand-colored ills.
Third Part: 'Die Lehren der Rosenkreuzer aus dem 16ten und 17ten
Jahrhundert. Oder, einfaltig ABC Buchlein fur junge Schuler so sich
taglich fleissig uben in der Schule des H. Geistes; Bildnissweisse vor die
Augen gemahlet zun neuen Jahrs-Exercitio in dem naturlichen und
theologischen Lichte von einem Bruder der Fraternitaet Christi des
Rosenkreuzes P.F. zum erstenmal offentlich bekannt gemacht'. Altona,
Joh. Dav. Ad. Eckhardt, [n.d.] ?. Title and 12 unnumbered leaves, more
than 40 hand-colored ills. In Folio. All three have dark blue wrappers.

Is it known how many copies have been originally printed? I remember
reading about 100. Does anybody have a detailed description of its
contents?

Many thanks,

Eugene Beshenkovsky
Subject: ACADEMY : Chrysomander
From: Gleb Butuzov
Date: Mon, 13 Dec 1999

Rafal Prinke wrote:

>Do you perhaps have bibliographic data of the translation of
>Sendivogius (this and any other works) into Russian? I am compiling
>his bibliography and have none of the Russian editions listed.

Dear Rafal,

You can find most complete list of the hermetic works translated by
Russian rosicrucians in the book by G. V. Vernadsky: "Russian
Masonry in Reign of Katherine II". Printing Plant of Printers' Joint
Stock Society. Petrograd, 1917.

"Novum Lumen Chemicum" in Russian was published by Lopukhin
in 1785: "Setoniy Cosmopolit. Novoye khimicheskoye svetilo iz
istochnika natury i ruchnago opyta pocherpnutoye. S prisovokupleniyem
filosofskoy pritchi i razgovora mezhdu Alchimikom, Mercuriyem i
Naturoyu" (the translation was based on the 1608 edition: Michael
Sedivogius "Novum Lumen Chymicum. E naturae fonte et manuali
experientia depromptum, et in duodecim tractatus divisum, cui
accessit dialogus Mercurii, Alchimiae et naturae").

Best wishes.

Gleb
Subject: ACADEMY : Sendivogius in Russian
Date: Tue, 14 Dec 1999
From: Rafal Prinke

Dear Gleb and Eugene,

Thank you very much for the detailed information. There seems to be
a difference of opinion concerning the item you both quote:

Eugene Beshenkovsky wrote:

> Novoe khimicheskoe svetilo, iz istochnika natury i ruchnago opyta
> pocherpnutoe: s prisovokupleniem Filosofskoi pritchi i Razgovora mezhdu
> Alkhimistom, Merkuriem i Naturoiu. Sochinenie Mikhaila Sendivogiia.
> Moskva: Tip. I. Lopukhina, 1785. [8], 146, [2] p. ; 8vo]
>
> SK, 3, no. 6456. Translated from: Sendivogius, Michael. Novum lumen
> chemicum, aus dem Brunnen der Natur durch handangelegte Erfahrung bewiesen
> : Nebst dem Gespräche des Mercurii, und dem Tractat vom Schwefel, und
> denen 55 Briefen. Nürnberg, 1766. BVB. Attributed to Setton by the
> compilers of 'The Uninon Catalog of the 18th century Russian
> Publicat'ions" citing Ferguson, 2, p. 369, 374-377. as authority.

Gleb Butuzov wrote:

> "Novum Lumen Chemicum" in Russian was published by Lopukhin
> in 1785: "Setoniy Cosmopolit. Novoye khimicheskoye svetilo iz
> istochnika natury i ruchnago opyta pocherpnutoye. S prisovokupleniyem
> filosofskoy pritchi i razgovora mezhdu Alchimikom, Mercuriyem i
> Naturoyu" (the translation was based on the 1608 edition: Michael
> Sedivogius "Novum Lumen Chymicum. E naturae fonte et manuali
> experientia depromptum, et in duodecim tractatus divisum, cui
> accessit dialogus Mercurii, Alchimiae et naturae").

Both citations make it a 1785 edition by Lopukhin, so they should be
the same - but:

1) the basis of the translation differs - either Paris 1608 in Latin
or Nurnberg 1766 in German (and if so, does it contain the 55 letters?)
2) original author attribution also differs - Seton or Sendivogius?

Could it be that G. V. Vernadsky's list is not quite exact? Or were there
indeed two different editions (doubtful)?

BTW: Does anyone know if there was a Spanish translation/edition of
Sendivogius?

Best regards,

Rafal
Subject: ACADEMY : Finis Gloriae Mundi
From: Jerry Bujas
Date: Tue, 14 Dec 1999

Pierre Stibia wrote:
> During this colloquium, Mrs. Beatrix Canseliet, his daughter, claimed
> this "Finis Gloria Mundi" is in fact an apocrypha.

Mike Dickman wrote:

> Be it said that Mme. Beatrice Canseliet, Canseliet's daughter, is quite
> categorical as to this book and assures us (if assurance we needed)
> that it is a fake.

Since "apocrypha" is not the same thing as "fake" I would greatly
appreciate more info on the subject. I am still impatiently waiting
for the book to cross the Atlantic and appear in my mailbox.
If you read it, could you cast more light on its content, please?
What about the style? Is it similar or dissimilar to the two previous
books by Fulcanelli? Do you have a feeling that both were written
by the same author? Any info will be greatly appreciated !

Thank you.

Jerry Bujas
Subject: ACADEMY : The Rose Cross and Phillip Sidney
Date: Mon, 13 Dec 1999
From: Michael Thomas Martin

Dear Michael Srigley,

Thank you so much for the response. It is encouraging and informative.
Besides Voet, I wonder if you can recommend any more sources on
Domus Charitatis?

All the best,

Michael Martin
Subject: ACADEMY : Sendivogius in Russian
From: Gleb Butuzov
Date: Mon, 13 Dec 1999

Dear Rafal,

I must add that I do not ever heard about any other Sendivogius'
translation into Russian besides one mentioned. Lopukhin's printing
plant was set up in Moscow.

I'm not sure that a single copy of this book survived the fire which
consumed most of Russian rosicrucians' library.

I hope this helps.

Regards.

Gleb
Subject: ACADEMY : Some queries
From: Eve Sinaiko
Date: Tue, 14 Dec 1999

Warm thanks to all who answered my bibliographic queries.
Your help was invaluable.

Eve Sinaiko
Subject: ACADEMY : Finis Gloriae Mundi
From: Adam McLean
Date: Wed, 15 Dec 1999

Jerry Bujas wrote :
>Since "apocrypha" is not the same thing as "fake" I would greatly
>appreciate more info on the subject. I am still impatiently waiting
>for the book to cross the Atlantic and appear in my mailbox.
>If you read it, could you cast more light on its content, please?
>What about the style? Is it similar or dissimilar to the two previous
>books by Fulcanelli? Do you have a feeling that both were written
>by the same author? Any info will be greatly appreciated !

I received my copy of this book yesterday. On just glancing
through the introduction and the first chapters of this book,
I find that this book presents itself as being written by a now
living Fulcanelli. He makes the point that this is not the book
which Eugene Canseliet mentioned. "This work is not the
manuscript that we withdrew from hands of our dear Canseliet.
This old work was imperfect, and could only have led astray
the researcher"

So this book 'Finis Gloriae Mundi' presents itself as a newly written
work, perhaps connected to but certainly not the same as that
which Canseliet had seen. It requires us further to accept that the
person who wrote the two Fulcanelli books published in the 1930's
is still alive and has now written his final work. This reminds me of the
conceit that Flamel continued to live into the 18th century. The book
seems to refer to ideas in books written quite recently. Mitochondrial
DNA for example. In one place he refers to the "H Bomb". As I cannot
read French with any ability, I cannot comment on the stylistic
similarities to the other works attributed to Fulcanelli.

Perhaps a book like this is a lesson to us all. Those who write
anonymously and hide behind aliases, will find they are fair game
for others to create pastische. It seems to me that Fulcanelli's works
are rather overhyped. When I read them I wonder just what new
material he presents to us, just what insights he gives to assisting
us to grasp the alchemical tradition. Fulcanelli is a phenomenon in
which one is asked to 'believe in'. Surely we have all grown up
enough now not to need to "believe in" a writer. A proper scholarly
approach to alchemy is necessary - one which looks at the source
material and through proper analysis and investigation discover
matters of real substance.

It will not take long for a person with a scholarly soul to understand
where this book is coming from, and the audience to which it is
targetted.

Adam McLean

Subject: ACADEMY : Sendivogius in Russian
Date: Wed, 15 Dec 1999
From: Eugene Beshenkovsky

Dear Rafal,

My information is from: 'Svodnyi katalog russkoi knigi grazhdanskoi
pechati XVIII veka. 1725-1800. Moskva: 'Kniga', 1962-1975. 6 vols.'
This is the Union katalog of 18th century Russian (secular)
publications. They state that 'Novum Lumen' was written by Setton
and published by Sendivogius. I would take this information
seriously because one of the compilers was N.P. Kiselev, one of
the best authorities on Western Mysticism in Russia at that time.

The Union catalog also states that translations in both editions, I
mentionned earlier, are different, and that et least 3 copies of
each book have survived.

All the best,

Eugene Beshenkovsky

P. S. 55 letters do not seem to be included.
Subject: ACADEMY : Finis Gloriae Mundi and the Canseliet Colloquium
Date: Wed, 15 Dec 1999
From: Mike Dickman

Jerry,

The exact words of Mme Béatrice Canseliet were: "It's a fake
Fulcanelli, a disgrace! It brings shame to the name
Fulcanelli-Canseliet!"... I don't think you could be much more
damning...

As to style, my personal impression is that the style in this
particular work is far inferior to that of either Canseliet or of his
august teacher, but Stanislas would be a far better judge of such
matters - not only as regards style and content but also as
regards authenticity.

The colloquium on Canseliet, be it said, was nothing if not
interesting, and this not only for the personalities present, but also
(and possibly even more so) for those who weren't...

It opened with Mme Canseliet evoking the memory of her
illustrious father, offering a definition of Alchemy as 'the perfection of
body and soul, of mind and awareness', and hinting (at that point) at
the apocryphal nature of the Finis Gloriae Mundi.

There followed an interesting account by Bertrand Renaud de la
Faverie, of his connections with Eugene Canseliet and others of his
circle, a theme taken up in various manner by several other speakers
throughout the weekend, and read a letter from Rene Alleau...

Johan Dreue, the co-organiser then read a communication from
Stanislas Klossowski de Rola on the same subject, thus leaving the
floor open to Henri Bodard, President of 'Atlantis', for a disquisition
on the 'language of the birds' - the phonetic Cabale...

The first morning in the hall where Ferdinand de Lesseps created
the French National Geographical Society was brought to a close
with a lecture and slide show by Mme Michele Debusne concerning
some of the unexplored 'philosophic dwelling-places' of the Bourgogne.

The afternoon opened with Michel Binda on post-Canseliet alchemy
and its ethics, which was a trifle long-winded to say the least, but was
thankfully followed by Francois Trojani's entertaining account of life
as a friend of Bernard Husson and Andre Savoret.

Patrick Riviere then followed with a fascinating slide show showing
the entire operation as laid-out by Canseliet and some of its most
surprising results which I really enjoyed and which seemed to go
down quite well with most of the audience.

Other definitions of alchemy arising from the day's work were
'Science par excellence', (Ruland's) 'the separation of the pure from
the less pure' and (Fulcanelli's own) 'permutation of form by light'.

The following day, in the Sorbonne-proper, the key-note speech
was a beautiful exposition of the operative path by Fabrice Bardeau,
who cited, among others, Betty-Jo Teeter-Dobbs and Newton and
Joseph Needham's monumental 'Science and Civilisation in China...

There then followed a lengthy disquisition on the epistemology of
the Royal Art by Robert Delvarre who is NOT the greatest of
readers, followed in his turn by the amazing and energy-filled
Paolo Lucarelli who spoke on Genesis and the Great Work and the
alchemists role in these. For this, the Bardeau and the Riviere alone,
the price of the colloqium was more than worth it...

The afternoon had two high points - Charles d'Hooghvoorst on the
life and work of Louis Cattiaux and Stephane Feye on his friendship
with and discipleship of d'Hooghvoorst's elder brother, Emmanuel.

What might have been a fairly interesting parallel between the
Catholic mass and the Great Work by Jean-Pierre Bonnerot turned
out to be nothing but bigotry, and the self-aggrandising 'revelation'
of yet another Canseliet-Fulcanelli plot by Richard Khaitzine just plain
boring...

All in all I found it a weekend well-spent, and my thanks goes to
Messrs. Dreue and Renaud de la Faverie for having organised it
and to Mmme Beatrice Canseliet for her presence as its kindly
and generous figurehead.

Perhaps it would not be inappropriate here to add a translation of
Rene Alleau's homage to Canseliet, who - after all - is probably the
very source of all our interest in the Royal Art.

The Flight of the Poenix

On his green pennae, sweeping across the Caspian
Did pilgrims track the Phoenix in flight
Who with his gems strews both wood and plain
With jewel and feather, at hazard bedight.

By the moon, by the stars and by distant journey
At last to the pyre of the Wise come they
Where rejoicing in a red most sanguine
Does this bird most impulsive forget all its origin.

From its ashes then gleam purest ruby,
Like an upturned sack of Tyrian purple most pure,
And the claws and the beak of the bird there fleeting
In the gold of its agony do cover themeselves o'er.

At so rich a vision, and at so rare a light,
All these pilgrims, by profit so steered,
Lowering their hands and their eyes, let fall goods and gain,
And in contemplation happier yet, here appear.

m
Subject: ACADEMY : Sendivogius in Russian
Date: Wed, 15 Dec 1999
From: Catherine Fox-Anderson

Rafal,

You asked about a Spanish translation -
Santiago Jubany offers his own, I believe on his
website - you could write him regarding earlier Spanish
language editions.

www.arrakis.es/~turba/BIBLIO.HTM

Regards,

Catherine

P.S. Can anyone tell me about Frater Albertus? Thank
you.
Subject: ACADEMY : The Correspondence of Robert Boyle
From: Adam McLean
Date: 16 Dec 1999

May I draw your attention to a new publication

The Correspondence of Robert Boyle, edited by Michael Hunter and
Antonio Clericuzio. British Academy Research Project. 6 volume set
£450 (ISBN 1 85196 125 9).

I have not seen these volumes, but they may contain some letters
of interest to research into Boyle's alchemical network.

If anyone has ready access to a copy I would appreciate them
looking up a reference in the index for me.

Adam McLean
Subject: ACADEMY : Paracelsus and Borges
Date: Sat, 18 Dec 1999
From: Michal Pober

Catherine Fox-Anderson wrote:

>If it was in Czech, my best friend could help me with it -
>she'll be in Prague for the holidays.

Dear Catherine,

Apologies for not getting back sooner!
I've been trying to complete a number of projects.
I can possibly put the book into her very hands, on a short-term basis!

>Can you recommend the new Alchemy Museum, and do
>you have an address?

The Alchemy Museum is still at a very early stage of gestation but
it is now moving in a very good direction. It will be in the Sankturinovsky
House and the tower behind it on the main square in Kutna Hora,
called Palackeho namesti.
What is already worth viewing in its own right is the spectacular
gothic tower with an extraordinary ceiling decoration which Rene
Alleau described as an alchemical masterpiece in itself.

Apart from this future museum there is also a permanent exhibition
in the Mihulka or Powder Tower at Prague Castle which, frankly I
never recommend to anyone because although it was supposedly
the site of alchemical work the exhibition is very strerile.

Much more interesting is the reproduction of Bavor Rodovsky's
Laboratory at the Castle of Budyne nad Ohri, which was partly put
together by Lubos Antonin. It is about a 45 minute drive NNW from
Prague.
Like all castles outside Prague it is closed during the winter
months but its not impossible to obtain a private viewing.

If you or anyone else has any questions about this or any other
specifics I will do my best to assist them. I can be contacted
off-line at :

michal@terminal.cz

Best Regards,

Michal Pober.

P.S. I'll be publishing a detailed description of the Alchemy Museum
Project as soon as possible after the fake millenium.
Meanwhile best wishes to all members of the Academy whatever
you may be choosing to celebrate!
Subject: ACADEMY : Sendivogius in Russian
Date: Fri, 17 Dec 1999
From: Rafal Prinke

Thanks to Gleb, Eugene and Catherine.

Eugene wrote:

> My information is from: 'Svodnyi katalog russkoi knigi grazhdanskoi
> pechati XVIII veka. 1725-1800. Moskva: 'Kniga', 1962-1975. 6 vols.'
> This is the Union katalog of 18th century Russian (secular)

So this seems more reliable than the 1912 bibliography Gleb
quoted. It is also more probable that the translation was based
on a well known German translation than a rather rare 1608 Latin
edition.

> publications. They state that 'Novum Lumen' was written by Setton
> and published by Sendivogius. I would take this information
> seriously because one of the compilers was N.P. Kiselev, one of
> the best authorities on Western Mysticism in Russia at that time.

This is the standard story which was "valid academic knowledge"
at that time - but recent scholarship proved beyond reasonable
doubt that the whole Seton/Sendivogius episode was a legend.

> The Union catalog also states that translations in both editions, I
> mentioned earlier, are different, and that at least 3 copies of
> each book have survived.

This is also important - thank you.

Best regards,

Rafal

Subject: ACADEMY : Finis Gloriae Mundi and the Canseliet Colloquium
Date: Sat, 18 Dec 1999
From: Michal Pober

Mike Dickman wrote:

>The exact words of Mme Béatrice Canseliet were: "It's a fake
>Fulcanelli, a disgrace! It brings shame to the name
>Fulcanelli-Canseliet!"... I don't think you could be much more
>damning...

Adam Mclean wrote:

>It will not take long for a person with a scholarly soul to understand
>where this book is coming from, and the audience to which it is
>targetted.

Dear Friends,

So why, oh why, did wise and erudite scholars like yourselves buy
this book and choose to support this venture, thereby encouraging
the perpetuation of similar exercises which do nothing to enhance
the reputation or the scholarly study of alchemy?
I can only imagine that the ghost of puffery bemused you in an
unguarded moment as it did so many otherwise wise and sane
patrons in times past.

Surely much more worthwhile to have spent the money on an
excellent bottle of wine to drink with the Comte de St Germain or
as a donation to a retirement home for ancient alchemists..

Puzzled in Kutna Hora!
Michal

Subject: ACADEMY : The Correspondence of Robert Boyle
Date: Fri, 17 Dec 1999
From: Urs Leo Gantenbein

According to Amazon.com this item will be published in April 2000.

Urs Leo Gantenbein
Subject: ACADEMY : Bibliotheca Kloss
From: Neil Wynes Morse
Date: Fri, 17 Dec 1999

The following comment may open up additional lines of enquiry.

In his article 'George Kloss and his Masonic Library'*, the
Librarian of the Grand East of the Netherlands, Evert Kwaadgras,
states:

The most important and precious parts of the book collection are, no
doubt, many old and extremely rare treatises on alchemy, many of
them in Latin, on the Knights Templar, the Rosicrucian manifestos
and the reactions - a very complete collection, starting from the first
Fama - the later Gold- and Rosicrucians, and the notorious Illuminati.

*contained in Ars Quatuor Coronatorum, vol 111, (1998), [ISBN 0
907655 432] at pages 25-43.

Neil Wynes Morse
Canberra, Australia
Subject: ACADEMY : Finis Gloriae Mundi and the Canseliet Colloquium
Date: Sat, 18 Dec 1999
From: Michal Pober

Mike Dickman wrote:

>The exact words of Mme Béatrice Canseliet were: "It's a fake
>Fulcanelli, a disgrace! It brings shame to the name
>Fulcanelli-Canseliet!"... I don't think you could be much more
>damning...

Adam McLean wrote:

>It will not take long for a person with a scholarly soul to understand
>where this book is coming from, and the audience to which it is
>targetted.

Dear Friends,

So why, oh why, did wise and erudite scholars like yourselves buy
this book and choose to support this venture, thereby encouraging
the perpetuation of similar exercises which do nothing to enhance
the reputation or the scholarly study of alchemy?
I can only imagine that the ghost of puffery bemused you in an
unguarded moment as it did so many otherwise wise and sane
patrons in times past.

Surely much more worthwhile to have spent the money on an
excellent bottle of wine to drink with the Comte de St Germain or
as a donation to a retirement home for ancient alchemists..

Puzzled in Kutna Hora!
Michal

Subject: ACADEMY : Finis Gloriae Mundi
Date: Sat, 18 Dec 1999
From: Adam McLean

Michal Pober wrote:

>So why, oh why, did wise and erudite scholars like yourselves
>buy this book and choose to support this venture, thereby
>encouraging the perpetuation of similar exercises which do
>nothing to enhance the reputation or the scholarly study of alchemy?
>Puzzled in Kutna Hora!

Michal,

There are a number of reasons why I bought this book.

Firstly, I always prefer to make my own judgment on a text. I
think it is a proper scholarly attitude to actually read a text
before passing judgement on it or accepting the views of others.
Many people have condemned this book before it was
published. I chose to examine the actual book before
assessing it. This is, I believe, the proper approach, at least it
is the one I have adopted over the years, and I think my
view of alchemy would have been substantially impoverished
if I chose to accept without question the views and agendas
of others.

Secondly, it is important for a scholar to be appraised of
recent developments in the public perception of alchemy.
Thus I bought a copy of Baigent and Leigh's 'The Elixir
and the Stone' which is absolute rubbish but which colours
the perception of alchemy in the wider public arena. Also I
have Goddard's 'Tower of alchemy', a misguided effort
to understand alchemical symbolism, which sadly will
no doubt influence many people who cannot think clearly.
It is important for a scholar of alchemy to read and be
aware of this material as it does often strongly shape the
public perception of alchemy and thus influences and
disturbs the intellectual environment in which scholars
work.

Thirdly, I see this 'Finis Gloriae Mundi' book as just part of
the Fulcanelli phenomenon. It, like the two works published
in the late 20's, doesn't seem to add to a scholarly perception
of alchemy. Indeed, I suspect most serious French scholars of
alchemy, have little time for the writings published under this
name. I know I will perhaps offend others by saying that I believe
people elevate Fulcanelli too high and seem to read his writings
from a reverential perspective. Perhaps with the appearance of
this book it will be timely for us to reassess the writings of Fulcanelli
and try to see what they actually say to us. They seem to me to
present a view of alchemy in history which is untenable and far
removed from the facts as we know them, and further do not
provide readers with any way forward to investigate alchemy for
themselves. So the third reason I bought this book was as an
example of the ongoing 'Fulcanelli phenomenon', as the 'Finis
Gloriae Mundi' continues and reworks the myth of Fulcanelli
for the end of the 20th century. In that sense it is part of the
historical evolution of a myth first devised in the late 20's and
30's of this century.

Adam McLean

Subject: ACADEMY : Sendivogius in Russian
Date: Sat, 18 Dec 1999
From: Eugene Beshenkovsky


Dear Rafal,

You wrote:

> > My information is from: 'Svodnyi katalog russkoi knigi grazhdanskoi
> > pechati XVIII veka. 1725-1800.

> So this seems more reliable than the 1912 bibliography Gleb
> quoted. It is also more probable that the translation was based
> on a well known German translation than a rather rare 1608 Latin
> edition.

Vernadskii's bibliography includes not only books but some manuscript
translations as well. I haven't seen any translations from Sendivogius
among them. I also think that 'Novum Lumen' was translated from German.
This might not be true with other works by Sendivogius included in this
edition. They are the same as those combined with the Michael Scott's
translation (published earlier), and were, probably, just corrected.

> >They state that 'Novum Lumen' was written by Setton
> >and published by Sendivogius.

> This is the standard story which was "valid academic knowledge"
> at that time - but recent scholarship proved beyond reasonable
> doubt that the whole Seton/Sendivogius episode was a legend.

I am glad to hear that. It is always better to have one author instead of
two.

> > The Union catalog also states that translations in both editions, I
> > mentioned earlier, are different, and that at least 3 copies of
> > each book have survived.

It does not seem to be a popular idea, but, if you want to have
adequate descriptions in your bibliography, you might need to
check the originals.
The 20th century Russian bibliographies always change the
orthography of 18th-19th century publications.

Best regards,

Eugene Beshenkovsky

Subject: ACADEMY : Terence McKenna - Coincidencia Oppositorum
Date: Sun, 19 Dec 1999
From: Mike Dickman

I thought readers might be inerested in the following, available via

http://www.mysticfire.com

Regards,
m

--------------------------------------------------

Terence McKenna
COINCIDENCIA OPPOSITORUM
A UNION OF OPPOSITES
Alchemy was not about the transmutation of crude metals into gold,
but was a magical art designed to bring the soul to completion.
--Terence McKenna

This film-in-progress from Mystic Fire is a visually rich exploration
of a lost world of magic and alchemy set in the late 16th and early
17th centuries, at a time when alchemy reached a feverish pitch
of interest in the European imagination.

The story, presented by Terence McKenna, centers on the
alchemical/political/religious movements surrounding the
Renaissance magus Dr. John Dee -- mathematician, astrologer
and advisor to Queen Elizabeth the First. John Dee laid the
ground for an alchemical and magically based society that took
root and flourished twenty years later in the marriage of the princess,
Elizabeth Stuart of England, to Frederick V, the Palatinate Prince
of Heidelberg.

The film, shot in England, Heidelberg, and Bohemia; will include
enacted scenes from Dee's diary; as Dee and his skryer Edward
Kelley invoke the guidance of angels in seances as they traveled
through Northern Europe on Dee's mission to Bohemia -- a little
known incident in European history which holds clues to
understanding the fate and evolution of modern science
and the nature of a lost world of magical and alchemical thinking.

Subject: ACADEMY : Finis Gloriae Mundi
From: Laly Warkentien
Date: Tue, 21 Dec 1999

Dear Adam,

Fulcanelli's books were never written nor intended for scholarly
pursuit, they were written for the students of Alchemy, and most
important, for the "farmers".

His regard for tittles and ribbons clearly abandoned for the much
more sought after "Cloak of Sapience", and anonymity. Finis
Gloriae Mundi has been declared a hoax, I will follow the scholarly
venue of reading it before labeling it as rubbish written for the
purpose of generating income, vileness has and shall always
exist along with humanity, diplomatically speaking. As for elevating
and revering this Master of Alchemy, perhaps it comes out of a
hidden knowledge, always there and only recognized as we read
his words, as we try to follow his sometimes devilish paths and
puzzles!. Fulcanelli a myth?.... perhaps for some. No offense
taken Adam, as no harm was intended.

Laly Warkentien
Subject: ACADEMY : Deconstructing Fulcanelli
From: Adam McLean
Date: Wed, 22 Dec 1999

Dear Laly Warkentien,

>Fulcanelli's books were never written nor intended for scholarly
>pursuit, they were written for the students of Alchemy, and most
>important, for the "farmers".

Although the Fulcanelli books may not have been written for
a scholarly audience, that does not mean that the ideas and
information presented in his books cannot be investigated
by a proper scholarly analysis.

Fulcanelli does present to the reader certain ideas about
alchemy and in particular its history. These ideas have been
very influential in shaping people's views on alchemy
(certainly in the French speaking world), so it is of concern to
a modern scholar to investigate, trace the sources, and any
errors potential in the Fulcanelli view of alchemy. No writer
can be beyond scholarly testing.

It is now recognised that there are a number of problems with
many of Fulcanelli's views on alchemy. I first became aware
of a problem with Fulcanelli's scholarship when I first discovered
'Le Demeures' in the mid 1970's. At the end of this book, you
may recall, Fulcanelli makes much of the Sundial at Holyrood
House in Edniburgh. He treats this as a unique item and makes
play of possible connections to the 'Order of the Thistle' and
to the Scottish adept Alexander Seton. The fact is that the sundial
in Holyrood House is not unique. There were many of these
constructed in stately homes in Central Scotland during
the mid 17th century. These 'unique' sundials, based on a
geometric solid, each carved face of which had small sundials,
moondials, etc., set into it, were merely a fashion of the time,
and were produced by a small group of monumental masons
in Scotland. These are well documented in the architectural
history of Scotland and there is an extensive article on these
in the 'Journal of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland'. There
is nothing mysterious or mystical about these. They were not
connected to any esoteric order. Nor do they have any
alchemical philosophy behind their construction. Indeed,
I recently found one of these (or rather a modern copy) in a
public garden a few miles from my home in Glasgow.

This is just one flaw in the picture of alchemy presented by
Fulcanelli. It arose from him having insufficient evidence
about this architectural fashion in Scotland, and projecting his
own elaborate interpretation upon it.

There are other problems with his books which people
have recognised. In general Fulcanelli presents a
romanticised view of alchemy. Scholars are always
alerted when they find an overly-romanticised attitude
in an author, as it almost invariably means that the
interpretations presented by such an author must be
carefully scrutinised and followed back to their sources
if possible.

The same scholarly analysis which will find the sources
of the 'Finis Gloriae Mundi' and locate it as a construction
of the 1990's, can and should be applied to Fulcanelli's
other books.

I know many people find such scholarly criticism unnerving
as it often seems to burst the bubble of a broadly drawn
romanticised picture. The important thing we are searching
for is the truth. A subject like alchemy needs people to seek
the truth, to trace back to the original source material. We
don't need to import sundials, Gothic cathedral architecture,
or even crop circle imagery, to our understanding of alchemy,
when few people have even read 1% of all alchemical
books and manuscripts. There are great treasures to be
found in manuscript in libraries still undocumented. It is in
this source material that the true secrets of alchemy can be
found.

I am constantly surprised that few people are willing
to look at the source material. For that is the true alchemical
ore in which scholars and academics will find the golden
nuggets of alchemy. Now there is a romanticised image !

Adam McLean

PS One of the key works upon which Fulcanelli drew for his
ideas about the alchemical imagery in the Gothic Cathedrals
was Esprit Gobineau de Montluisant, 'Explication des Enigmes et
Figures hierogliphiques, qui sont au grand Portail de l'Eglise...
de Notre Dame de Paris'. (Published in the 'Bibliotheque des
philosophes chimiques', 1740-54.)
This was recently translated into English by Mike Dickman and
published by me. There has been absolutely no interest in
this text, without which one surely cannot appreciate the sources
for Fulcanelli's ideas. Few people, it appears, are interested in
getting to the roots of alchemy.
Subject: ACADEMY : Sendivogius in Spanish printed editions.
From: Jose Rodríguez
Date: 29 Dec 1999

Dear Rafal:

There are no Spanish printed editions of Sendivogius works before
the 20th century. I know of:

a.. El Cosmopolita. «Nueva Luz Química», ed. J. Fonfría, Madrid, 1995.
I think it is a Spanish translation of: Le Cosmopolite. «Nouvelle lumière
chymique...», ed Laurent d'Houry, Paris, 1976.

b.. El Cosmopolita. «Carta Filosófica», in: Juli Peradejordi. "Cuatro
Tratados de Alquimia", ed Visión Libros, 1979. This "Carta Filosófica"
(Philosophical Letter) is a Spanish translation of: Sendivogius.
«Lettre Philosophique», ed Duval, Paris, 1671.

c.. Sendivogius. «Carta Filosófica de Miguel Sendivogius», in:
Mario Martínez Arroyo. "Siete Textos de Alquimia", ed Kier, Madrid,
1943 (reprinted 1947, 1978, 1982, 1994). It is another Spanish translation
of: Sendivogius. «Lettre Philosophique», ed Duval, Paris, 1671. There
is an electronic transcription in:

http://www.levity.com/alchemy/span21.html

Happy new year...

Jose Rodríguez
Subject: ACADEMY : Sendivogius in Spanish printed editions
Date: Wed, 29 Dec 1999
From: Rafal Prinke

Dear Jose,

> There are no Spanish printed editions of Sendivogius works before
> the 20th century. I know of:

Thank you very much for the valuable information.

> There is an electronic transcription in:
> http://www.levity.com/alchemy/span21.html

I have seen it but the source of that text is not mentioned there
(and my e-mail to the owner remained unanswered).

> Happy new year...

And the same to you - and everyone on this list, especially Adam
McLean, whose efforts to make alchemical information freely
available and to create a forum for sensible scholarly discussion
of it are simply incredible. Thank you, Adam!

Best regards,

Rafal