Alchemy Academy archive
December 2001

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Subject: ACADEMY : Bibliotheca chimica
Date: Sun, 02 Dec 2001
From: Rafal T. Prinke
Reply to: alchemy-academy@dial.pipex.com

Dear Susanna,

> Is Borel an entirely false source or are there some reliable parts?

I am sure there are reliable parts - the problem is to sort
them out (as it often is with most sources).

> Is Borel's Bibliotheca the source I mention below?

> As Rafal has told me
> this summer Pierre Borel reproduces a letter where Pierre Des
> Noyers sketches a biography of Sendivogius dated 1651 in
> Warsaw, where he makes his controversial claim that Sendivogius
> got his projection powder from an "Englishman" called Cosmopolita,
> later identified as Alexander Seton.

No, the letter is in his _Trésor de recherches et antiquitez gauloises_
which I downloaded from gallica a few days ago (after trying for some
three months and always receiving an error message).

> Or is Des Noyers' story in Borel entirely a Lûgende to use
> a phrase of Joachim Telle.

Where does he say so?

Most of the story is certainly false (as I have shown using
primary sources) - but obviously Des Noyers was a serious
person and just recorded what he had been told.

Best regards,

Rafal


Subject: ACADEMY : Early history of alchemy in Europe
From: Claude Gagnon
Date: Mon, 3 Dec 2001

Dear Mr. McLean,

You may find a very original paper on the history of alchemy seen
«from Unctuous Moisture to Phlogiston» by Gad Freudenthal in
Alchemy revisited, procedings of the conference on the History of
Alchemy at the University of Groningen in 1989, the year Prof.
Newman published the article you have mentioned. The whole
conference was on the History of alchemy; many papers
of the conference show that alchemy was very well alive after the
Middle Ages, the Renaissance and still growing in the Classical Age.

Claude Gagnon


Subject: ACADEMY : Bibliotheca chimica
From: Susanna Åkerman
Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2001

Dear Rafal,

Joachim Telle's expression a Lûgende (a lying legend) is his
own and I have read it somewhere in his articles, but I do not
think it was in his Hartprecht/Hautnorton essay.

Thank you for locating Borel's text.


Susanna


Subject: ACADEMY : Early history of alchemy in Europe
Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2001
From: Catherine Fox-Anderson

Dear Claude

>You may find a very original paper on the history of
>alchemy seen «from Unctuous Moisture to Phlogiston»
>by Gad Freudenthal in Alchemy revisited, procedings
>of the conference on the History of Alchemy at the University
>of Groningen in 1989

Is there a general collection of those
papers available? Do you recall any regarding the
practice of alchemy on the Iberian Penninsula- whether
pagan, Christian, Muslim, or Jewish practioners?

Thank you,

Catherine Fox-Anderson


Subject: ACADEMY : Bibliotheca chimica
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2001
From: Rafal T. Prinke

Dear Susanna,

> Joachim Telle's expression a Lûgende (a lying legend) is his
> own and I have read it somewhere in his articles, but I do not
> think it was in his Hartprecht/Hautnorton essay.

Thank you. If you happen to find out where it was, I shall be
grateful.

> Thank you for locating Borel's text.

I did not mention that there is also Ferguson's _Bibliotheca
chemica_ on gallica.

Best regards,

Rafal


Subject: ACADEMY : Roth-Scholtz's engravings
Date: Tue, 04 Dec 2001
From: Rafal T. Prinke

There is a series of engraved portraits of alchemists based on
the medallions on the title page of Maier's _Symbola aureae
mensae_, but also uncluding other persons (eg. Khunrath), all
of which are signed "Ex collectione Friderici Roth-Scholtzii
Norimberg.".

Some of them are reproduced in the catalogue from the 1991
exhibition in Herzog August Bibliothek entitled _Chemie
zwischen Magie und Wissenschaft. Ex Bibliotheca Chymica
1500-1800_. Unfortunately, the captions refer to the books by
the portrayed alchemists which cannot contain these
engravings for chronological reasons.

I wonder if they were perhaps published in Roth-Scholtz's
_Bibliotheca chemica, oder Catalogus von chymisches
beucher_?

Best regards,

Rafal


Subject: ACADEMY : Bibliotheca chimica
From: Stanislas Klossowski de Rola
Date: Tue, 4 Dec 2001

Dear Susanna,

Please forgive me for not finding the time sooner to answer your
interesting query about Borel and Desnoyers.

In Vol.I of his "Histoire de la Philosophie Hermetique" Paris 1742
l'Abbé Lenglet du Fresnoy gives a lengthy and detailed account
of Sendivogius and the Cosmopolite p323-333. He follows this
account with the letter from Desnoyers (pages 334-349) stating in
a note:"As this letter was not in its rightful place in the Tresor de
Recherches & Antiquités Gauloises & Françoises de Pierre Borel;
in-4. Paris 1655. page 479, I thought it would be found more fitting here."

Lenglet Dufresnoy further publishes from Borel (op. cit. pages
474-581) A bilingual, latin and French "Life of Sendivogius" by his
German lawyer drawn, according to the text from an oral account
given By Jan Bodowski, Sendivogius's Majordomo. This
occupies pages 350-367.

If I can supply more details I will be very happy to do so.

Stanislas Klossowski de Rola



Subject: ACADEMY : Bibliotheca chimica
Date: Thu, 06 Dec 2001
From: Rafal T. Prinke

Dear Stanislas,

> In Vol.I of his "Histoire de la Philosophie Hermetique" Paris 1742
> l'Abbé Lenglet du Fresnoy gives a lengthy and detailed account

Could you please tell me if he says anything about Venceslaus Lavinus?
I became interested in him but cannot find any information about
his life, dates, etc. The only fact I know is that he was
acquainted with Sendivogius in Prague in the 1590's, where they
worked together in Koralek's alchemical laboratory.

Best regards,

Rafal


Subject: ACADEMY : Wenceslas Lavinius
From: Stanislas Klossowski de Rola
Date: 7 Dec 2001

Dear Rafal,

The only information about Lavinius in Lenglet DU FRESNOY is as
follows:

In vol I op. cit. page 472 under the heading Chronologie des plus
celebres auteurs de la Philosophie Hermetique we read:

1553, Venceslas Lavinius, Moravian gentleman, of whom we have
but one Treatise, which contains but three pages, but which is
esteemed.

In the index of the same volume Lenglet du Fresnoy usually extremely
stingy in his praises refers to him as "Philosophe habile" i.e. clever
Philosopher.
In volume 3 page 201 we have a reference to the original edition of
his famous treatise: "Venceslay LAVINI Tractatus de Caelo terrestri,
in-8. Marpurgi. 1612. Cum Nigri Happelii Cheiragogia Heliana,
se trouve aussi dans le Theatre Chimique, & dans la Bibliotheque
de Salmon". I should add that Le Traite du Ciel Terrestre also
appears in vol I of the Bibliotheque des Philosophes Chimiques
Paris 1741

Fulcanelli in Les Demeures Philosophales states that Lavinius
"gives the secret of the Work in fifteen lines in the Enigme du
Mercure philosophal which is to be found in the Traité du Ciel
terrestre.

I hope this is of some help to you.

All the very best

Stanislas Klossowski de Rola


Subject: ACADEMY : Early history of alchemy in Europe
From: Claude Gagnon
Date: 9 Dec 2001

Dear Catherine Fox-Anderson,

> Is there a general collection of those papers available?

Here is the reference you asked for:

Von Martels (Z.R.W.M.) Ed., Alchemy revisited, Leiden-New
York, Brill, 1990, 284 pp.

Claude Gagnon


Subject: ACADEMY : Wenceslas Lavinius
Date: Wed, 12 Dec 2001
From: Rafal T. Prinke

Dear Stanislas,

Thank you very much for the valuable information.

> In vol I op. cit. page 472 under the heading Chronologie des plus
> celebres auteurs de la Philosophie Hermetique we read:
>
> 1553, Venceslas Lavinius, Moravian gentleman, of whom we have
> but one Treatise, which contains but three pages, but which is
> esteemed.

I wonder if the context suggests what does the year 1553 refer
to? I would guess it may be his birth year because he was
still active in the 1590's - and maybe still alive when his
treatise was first published in 1612.

Best regards,

Rafal


Subject: ACADEMY : Wenceslas Lavinius
From: Wendy Mullen
Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001

Dear Group,

I was wondering if anyone had any information that can be found
online concerning Wenceslas Lavinius.

Thanks
Wendy


Subject: ACADEMY : Beccafumi
From: Adam McLean
Date: 13 December 2001

There is a famous series of woodcuts by Domenico Deccafumi
(1486-1551) often considered to be among the earliest representations
of alchemy in a printed form. See Jacques van Lennep 'Alchemie'
pages 153.

Today a colleague sent me a copy of an interesting article
published in The Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin for
Summer 1960. This issue has an article by Caroline
Karpinski 'The Alchemist's Illustrator' (pages 8- 14)
which discusses the twelve Beccafumi woodcuts in some
detail. The woodcuts are sometimes associated with
Biringuccio's 'Pirotechnia' 1540, but Karpinski argues that
the Beccafumi series is so sympathetic to alchemists
that it would not accord with the more critical view of
Biringuccio's 'Pirotechnia' .

Beccafumi is reported to have designed part of the
famous mosaic pavements of Sienna cathedral. I
am familiar with the well known Hermes Trismegistus
mosaic, but I am not sure if this was the work of
Beccafumi. I have read it was made in about 1488, but
this may be wrong. This mosaic certainly is very linear
and very close in style to a woodcut.

Does anyone have any more information either
on Beccafumi or on the mosaic pavements at
Sienna? Are other hermetic images depicted
there?

Adam McLean


Subject: ACADEMY : Conference in Denmark
Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001
From: Michal Pober

Dear Friends,

Would anyone who was at the Arhus Conference be willing to
give a detailed [?!] account of what transpired for those of us
who were not fortunate enough to be there.

Best Regards,

Michal Pober


Subject: ACADEMY : Beccafumi
Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001

Dear Adam,

Beccafumi's dates are 1484/6 - 1551. So if your dates on the mosaic
floor are correct, he was too young to have done it. Though of the
same generation as other "High Renaissance" artists, he was
more known as a mannerist. He was in Rome 1510-12. His painting
style is not that linear- much more interested in color. Both woodcut
and floor mosaic are linear by nature though, and so any artist
working in those mediums would use linear elements. He did work in
Siena. I will get more info. for you next week. I am currently in a time
crunch now for end of semester.

You can look him up on any of the art web sights, a famous work of
his is:

"Saint Catherine receiving the Stigmata" c. 1514 in the Academy
of Art, Siena.

Check out:

http://www.artcyclopedia.com

http://www.oir.ucf.edu/wm/

http://gallery.euroweb.hu

P.S.
Francis Yates discusses the floor mosaics in Siena in one of her
books, can't remember which one off the top of my head.



Subject: ACADEMY : Beccafumi
From: Eve Sinaiko
Date: Thu, 13 Dec 2001

Dear Adam,

I have forwarded your inquiry to a friend who knows a good
deal about Beccafumi.

Regarding the Siena pavement: the Hermes Trismegistus is
the first image in the central aisle of the nave, just inside the main
portal, which gives it a certain impact. (For example, that is
the location of the enigmatic circular Jerusalem labyrinth pavements
in French Gothic cathedrals, though those are much older. Some
scholars think they represent a virtual pilgrimage or transformative
journey, though that is disputed.) The second panel is a circle or
wheel image with the heraldic emblem of Siena at the center,
surrounded by heraldic animals (not the Zodiac, but possibly
Christian: e.g., I see a pelican, among other creatures). It may
have some arcane meaning attached. Others, I think, are biblical
scenes. I remember a large one in one of the transepts of the
Massacre of the Innocents, for example. The aisle panels include
images of the Sybils, with inscriptions.

Grove Dict. of Art says little, noting only that the historiated marble
pavement was begun in 1369 and completed in the mid-1500s.
Elsewhere Beccafumi is credited with the pavement scene in the
center of the crossing, under the dome, but is not identified with
the Hermes image, as far as I can see. (He also did some of the
frescoes in the church and 8 bronze angels.)

Other artists who seem to have designed some of the images
include Pinturicchio, Guidoccio Cozzarelli, Matteo di Giovanni,
Antonio Federighi, and Francesco di Giorgio. Vasari says
Duccio also had a hand in their design, for what that's worth.
One source says there were over 40 artists all told.

The whole cathedral is said to have been built on the site of a
temple to Minerva, which may suggest an arcane tradition
associated with its decorative program.

That's all I can find offhand, but it's an interesting question. There
has been considerable scholarship done on the pavements,
and I am sure the iconography is catalogued somewhere. I'll
see if it can be found.

Regards,

Eve Sinaiko


Subject: ACADEMY : Can anyone help with texts, please!
Date: Sun, 16 Dec 2001
From: Michal Pober

Dear Academy Members,

For the Alchemy Museum in Kutna Hora [scheduled to
open in March, date to be confirmed], I would greatly appreciate
a little help with some texts for our information panels.

First whether someone would have time to check a brief
[less than 250 words] description of Paracelsus' work, which I
can forward forthwith!

Second if someone could offer, or point me to descriptions
of the Dry Way and the Wet Way, each in approximately 300
words. An already published source would be fine, provided
There is no copyright problem.

Best Regards,

Michal Pober


Subject: ACADEMY : Wenceslas Lavinius
Date: Tue, 18 Dec 2001
From: Rafal T. Prinke


Wendy Mullen wrote:

> I was wondering if anyone had any information that can be found
> online concerning Wenceslas Lavinius.

I understand you have seen the recent mail from Stanislas
Klossowski de Rola on what Langlet du Fresnoy says about him?
Otherwise, I have not been able to find any additional
information on the Web - besides mentions of his (apparently
only) treatise.

It is also known (from contemporary court-of-justice records)
that he lived in Prague in the 1590's and was an acquitance of
Michael Sendivogius.

Have you been able to find anything else?

Best regards,

Rafal


Subject: ACADEMY : Wenceslas Lavinius
From: Wendy Mullen
Date: Wed, 19 Dec 2001

Dear Rafal,

This is the only site I have been able to find that contains the
name Wenceslas Lavinius.

http://www.ttecla.es/lapuerta/ar8.html

Since I only speak and read English it's not of much help to
me, maybe you will gain something from it.

Hope it helps in the search.

Best wishes,

Wendy Mullen


Subject: ACADEMY : Wenceslas Lavinius - a general point on research
From: Adam McLean
Date: Wed, 19 Dec 2001
Wendy Mullen said,

>This is the only site I have been able to find that contains the
>name Wenceslas Lavinius.

This only shows that it is so difficult, almost impossible, to do
significant research into Alchemy using only web resources.
Magnificent though the Internet may be, the bulk of alchemical
material books and manuscripts (well over 99% I expect) is not
available in electronic form.

To undertake any significant research into alchemical material
still requires visits to libraries or spending lots of money on
having microfilms or photographs made, as I, and many
of my colleagues here, will know to our cost only too well.

Maybe in twenty years or so there may be a significant corpus of
alchemical material on the web, but this will require the work
today of scholars and enthusiasts like ourselves to put it
there. There is so much needing to be done and so few
people with the time and resources to do it. My own web
site and those of other contributors to this discussion group
such as Jose Rodríguez and Arthur Versluis among others,
merely scratches the surface.

Today we still live in a transition era with the printed book
and journal still being the main vehicle for publishing serious
studies on alchemy and a number of the contributors to this
discussion group continue to write and get their research
published.

Through the Internet there is a great opportunity for people
researching today to share their work widely and contribute
towards the greater understanding of alchemy in all its facets.
But when we seek for some detail, such as Rafal wishes, the
internet resources often let us down. Really important things
are out there but there are some totally blank areas.

It is up to those working today to build the Internet resources
for the future. There is so little funding available for research
but, luckily, publishing on the internet is really very inexpensive.
I will always try (within the obvious limitations of my own
resources) to make research material available. Perhaps it
is time we as researchers realised the need to share our
research even when incomplete and fragmentary. This
group does share reseach generously, of course, but perhaps
there is a need for some wider sharing of research notes.
It would be great we could build an extensive library of
research as well as original alchemical texts and images.

As ever, I dream of having the resources to support such
efforts.

Adam McLean


Subject: ACADEMY : Wenceslas Lavinius - a general point on research
Date: Thu, 20 Dec 2001
From: Rafal T. Prinke
Dear Adam,

> Magnificent though the Internet may be, the bulk of alchemical
> material books and manuscripts (well over 99% I expect) is not
> available in electronic form.

I would estimate it at 99.99999999% :-)

> Maybe in twenty years or so there may be a significant corpus of
> alchemical material on the web, but this will require the work
> today of scholars and enthusiasts like ourselves to put it
> there. There is so much needing to be done and so few
> people with the time and resources to do it. My own web
> site and those of other contributors to this discussion group
> such as Jose Rodríguez and Arthur Versluis among others,
> merely scratches the surface.

This is what worries me, too - and I do not think that at this pace
the situation changes significantly in 20 years' time. Even though
many (or most) of the texts of crucial importance have now been
made available by you and others, they are mostly in modern
(or 19th c.) translation - and it would be equally important
(or even more important) to have the original texts for comparison
or checking the places which are crucial and/or uncertain
in translation. It is quite obvious now that producing reliable
electronic full text editions is very time consuming and expensive,
and because there is little to none interest in financing
alchemical studies among the research-funding bodies, I now think
that it would be better, easier and faster to make electronic
facsimile editions available over the net.

I know that you, Adam, are considering this, too. The example
of Gallica shows how good it is and how many books can be
digitized in a relatively short time. A similar (but paid)
project is that of Early English Books Online, and I am told
there is a million items to be made available at the National
Library of Brazil (but I can't find them on their Web site).

> It is up to those working today to build the Internet resources
> for the future. There is so little funding available for research
> but, luckily, publishing on the internet is really very inexpensive.

The problem for scholarly researchers is the brutal academic
reality - where electronic publications are not recognized
and respected (or at least not as much as the paper versions).
This is especially true of the humanities.

> I will always try (within the obvious limitations of my own
> resources) to make research material available. Perhaps it
> is time we as researchers realised the need to share our
> research even when incomplete and fragmentary. This
> group does share reseach generously, of course, but perhaps
> there is a need for some wider sharing of research notes.
> It would be great we could build an extensive library of
> research as well as original alchemical texts and images.

How about reviving _The Hermetic Journal_ in a new medium?
I think that you now respected in academic circles (as the
number of academics on this list proves) and would be able
to create a peer-reviewed journal, with its editorial
and advisory boards of well known names, etc. Being unlimited
by print and paper costs, such journal could - besides
monographic articles - have a "Notes & Queries" section of
research fragments, which would with time amount to
a database of the sort you describe.

> As ever, I dream of having the resources to support such
> efforts.

Your dreams somehow always tend to come true...

Best regards,

Rafal


Subject: ACADEMY : Wenceslas Lavinius
Date: Wed, 19 Dec 2001
From: Rafal T. Prinke

Dear Wendy,

> This is the only site I have been able to find that contains the
> name Wenceslas Lavinius.

There are more - with slight variants in spelling of his name.
But none says anything beyond mentioning him as the author
of the treatise.

Best regards,

Rafal


Subject: ACADEMY : Mélanges offerts à Antoine Faivre
From: Adam McLean
Date: 20 Dec 2001

This excellent and massive volume dedicated to the great modern
scholar of esotericism in all its facets, Antoine Faivre, has many
articles on alchemy and many on related matters. Here is the complete
table of contents. You will note that many of the most important scholars
of our times have contributed to this volume.


ESOTERISME, GNOSES & IMAGINAIRE SYMBOLIQUE:
MÉLANGES offerts à Antoine FAIVRE
Edité par Richard CARON, Joscelyn GODWIN, WouterJ. HANEGRAAFF
& Jean- Louis VIEILLARD-BARON

PEETERS, 2001




TABLE DE MATIÈRES
Jean-Robert ARMOGATHE, Liminaire. XI

PARTIE I. ALCHIMIE. HERMÉTISME. KABBALE.

Roelof VAN DEN BROEK, A Dutch Painting of Mercurius Hermes 3
Richard CARON, Notes sur l'histoire de l'alchimie en France à la fin du XlX et au début du XX siècle 17
Allison P. COUDERT, Seventeenth-Century Natural Philosophy and Esotericism at the Court of Sulzbach 27
Allen G. DEBUS, French Alchemy in the Early Enlightenment 47
Claude GAGNON, Comparaison des deux versions latines du 'Livre des Figures hiéroglyphiques' attribué à Nicolas Flamel. 61
Moshe IDEL, Kabbalah and Hermeticism in Dame Frances A. Yates's
Renaissance 71
Didier KAHN, Architecture, Réforme et alchimie en Franche-Comté vers 1560 91
Wallace KIRSOP, Les collections de livres alchimiques entre 1700 et 1830: adeptes, curieux et bibliophiles. 101
Sylvain MATTON, Les 'Metamorphoses' d'Apulée dans la littérature alchimique de la Renaissance au XVIII siècle 113
Monika NEUGEBAUER-WOLK, 'Denn dis ist Müglich, Lieber Sohn!': Zur esoterischen Übersetzungstradition des Corpus Hermeticum in der frühen Neuzeit 131
Mirko SLADEK, Die Feuerpriester am Portikus der Markusbibliothek in Venedig: Zur Feueranbetung in der Ikonographie der Renaissance. 145
Joachim TELLE, Die "Rand der Philosophen": Zu einem Lehrbild der frühneuzeitlichen Alchimia-Picta-Tradition 165
Thomas WILLARD, The Enigma of Nicolas Barnaud: An Alchemical Riddle from Early Modern France. 199


PARTIE II. ROMANTISME ALLEMAND. NATURPHILOSOPHIE. THÉOSOPHIE CHRÉTIENNE

Reinhard BREYMAYER, Im Spannungsfeld zwischen Spinoza und Thomasius bei Zinzendorf: Emanuel Wollebs Stammbucheintrag für Friedrich Christoph Oetinger, Herrnhut, 27. April 1730 217
Pierre DEGHAYE, "Gedulla" et "Gebura". Le Dictionnaire biblique et emblématique' de Friedrich Christoph Oetinger (1776) 233
Dietrich VON ENGELHARDT, Naturforschung als Mythologie und Mission bei Johann Salomo Christoph Schweigger (1779-1857) 249
Jacques FABRY, Du Piétisme à la théosophie: Johann Heinrich Jung-Stilling (1740-1817) 267
Maurice DE GANDILLAC, Deux images cusaines: l'icône de Bruxelles et le jeu de boules 279
Helmut GEBELEIN, Zur Alchemie im Werke Novalis. 285
Nicole JACQUES-LEFEVRE, Esquisse d'une anthropologie saint-martinienne 301
Jean-François MARQUET, Fondement et milieu chez Franz von Baader 315
Heinrich SCHIPPERGES, Der Mensch - Ein Kosmometer: Präludium einer Anthropologie bei Novalis. 325
Gerhard WEHR, Rudolf Steiner und C. G. Jung in Konfrontation und Synopse 337
Jane WILLIAMS-HOGAN, Emanuel Swedenborg and the Kabbalistic Tradition 343


PARTIE III. FRANC-MAÇONNERIE. PERENNIALISME ET COURANT TRADITIONNEL. SECTES ET SOCIETES SECRETES.

Roger DACHEZ, La parathéurgie chez Jean-Baptiste Willermoz et dans la Maçonnerie rectifiée: Approche d'un concept. 363
Roland EDIGHOFFER, Utopie et sodalité selon Johann Valentin Andreae 373
R.A. GILBERT, 'The Supposed Rosy Crucian Society'. Bulwer-Lytton and The S.R.I.A. 389
Joscelyn GODWIN, The Survival of the Personality, according to Modern Esoteric teachings 403
Hans Thomas HAKL, Die Magie bei Julius Evola und Ihre Philosophischen Voraussetzungen 415
Jean-François MAYER, The Dangers of Enlightenment: Apocalyptic Hopes and Anxieties in the Order of the Solar Temple 437
Pierre MOLLIER, Où l'innocente manie de la bibliophilie maçonnique révèle l'existence d'une bibliothèque secrète réunie jadis par un adepte oublié 453
Charles PORSET, "Fructu cognoscitur arbor". Jésuites et franc-maçons: Un dossier revisité 459
James A. SANTUCCI, Does Theosophy Exist in the Theosophical Society? 471
Marsha Keith SCHUCHARD, Ramsay, Swift, and the Jacobite-Masonic Version of the Stuart Restauration. 491
Jan SNOEK, A Manuscript Version of Héraults Ritual 507


PARTIE IV: IMAGINATION, IMAGINAIRE ET IMAGINAL.

John Patrick DEVENEY, H. P. Blavatsky and Spirit Art 525
Claude-Gilbert DUBOIS, L'invention prédictive dans les Prophéties' de Nostradamus 547
Franck GREINER, Littérature et imagination à l'ère du Nouvel Age. 559
Wouter J. HANEGRAAFF, Ironic Esotericism: Alchemy and Grail Mythology in Thomas Mann's 'Zauberberg' 575
Massimo INTROVIGNE, Antoine Faivre: Father of Contemporary Vampire Studies 595
Stanton J. LlNDEN, Margaret Cavendish and Robert Hooke: Optics and Scientific Fantasy in 'The Blazing World' 611
Christopher McINTOSH, Gardens of Initiation: Horticulture, Esoteric Symbolism and the Spirit of Play. 625
Jean MARIGNY, Vampirisme et initiation: 639
Gilles MÉNÉGALDO, Quelques aspects de la parodie dans les films de vampires: l'exemple de Tod Browning ('Mark of the Vampire', et de Roman Polanski ('The Fearless Vampire Killers') 653
John F. MOFFITT , Modern Extraterrestrial Portraiture: An Art-Historical Inquest 669
Marco PASI, The Influence of Aleister Crowley on Fernando Pessoa's Esoteric Writings 693
Arthur VERSLUIS, Magical Fiction. 713
Jean-Jacques WUNENBURGER, Les révélations du miroir dans la métaphysique imaginale 725
Annexe. Frédérick TRISTAN, Atalante (nouvelle inédite) 735

PARTIE V. MÉTHODOLOGIE(S) ET PERSPECTIVES EN HISTOIRE DE L'ÉSOTÉRISME

Jean-Pierre BRACH, Quelques réflexions sur les fondements spéculatifs de la symbolique des nombres. 741
Maurice-Ruben HAYOUN, Pour une biographie intellectuelle de Gershom Scholem : Entre Berlin et Jérusalem. 749
Jean-Pierre LAURANT, Ésotérisme et transmission. 765
Pierre LORY, Le paradoxe dans la mystique: Le cas de Hallaj 773
Seyyed Hossein NASR, Henry Corbin (1903-1978): Souvenirs et réflexions sur son influence intellectuelle vingt ans après. 783
Emile POULAT, De la pensée traditionnelle à la pensée virtuelle. 797
Pierre A. RlFFARD, L'ésotérisme nous apprend-il quelque chose ? 807
James B. ROBINSON, Correspondance and Transformation. 819
Jérôme ROUSSE-LACORDAIRE, " Rapatriements" théologiques de la forme de pensée ésotérique: l'apport de la taxinomie d'Antoine Faivre à la réflexion théologique 831
Ivan STRENSKI, Liberal Protestant Theology and/ or the 'Science Religieuse'? 841
Frédérick TRISTAN, Les 'Cahiers de l'Hermétisme' 855
Jean-Louis VIEILLARD-BARON, L'Ésotérisme entre religion et philosophie: Pour une élucidation conceptuelle 859

APPENDICE

Antoine FAIVRE: Bibliographie (1960-2000) établie par Richard CARON etMarco PASI 875
Index des Noms 919


Subject: ACADEMY : Wenceslas Lavinius
Date: Thu, 20 Dec 2001
From: Dusan Djordjevic Mileusnic

While looking for any information on WWW about Lavinius,
I came across these two documents, in which Lavinius is
mentioned, but nothing else.

These documents might be important for some other research.
Here are the addresses.

First one contains four articles by Chevreul from the year 1851.
The address is

http://perso.wanadoo.fr/chrysopee/chevreui/articles.htm

The second one is the whole book by Albert Poisson : Theories et
Symboles des Alchimistes. It is at

www.multimania.com/hermetisme/poisson/symboles.pdf

Dusan